Update Colvars to version 2018-12-18
[namd.git] / ug / ug_colvars.tex
1 % This file is part of the Collective Variables module (Colvars).
2 % The original version of Colvars and its updates are located at:
3 % https://github.com/colvars/colvars
4 % Please update all Colvars source files before making any changes.
5 % If you wish to distribute your changes, please submit them to the
6 % Colvars repository at GitHub.
7
8 \cvnamdugonly{
9 \section{Collective Variable-based Calculations (Colvars)}
10 \label{section:colvars}
11
12 The features described in this section were originally contributed to NAMD by Giacomo Fiorin (NIH) and J\'er\^ome H\'enin (CNRS, France) and are currently developed at this external repository:\\
13 \cvurl{https://github.com/Colvars/colvars}\\
14 An updated version of this section can also be downloaded as a separate manual: \\
15 HTML: \cvurl{https://colvars.github.io/colvars-refman-namd/colvars-refman-namd.html} \\
16 PDF: \cvurl{https://colvars.github.io/pdf/colvars-refman-namd.pdf}\\
17
18 See section~\ref{sec:colvars_config_changes} for specific changes that affect compatibility between versions.
19 Please ask any usage questions through the NAMD mailing list, and development questions through GitHub.
20
21 \subsection*{Overview}
22 }
23
24 \cvvmdugonly{
25 \chapter{Collective Variables Interface (Colvars)}
26 \label{section:colvars}
27
28 The features described in this section were originally contributed to VMD by Giacomo Fiorin (NIH) and J\'er\^ome H\'enin (CNRS, France) and are currently developed at this external repository:\\
29 \cvurl{https://github.com/Colvars/colvars}\\
30 An updated version of this section can also be downloaded as a separate manual: \\
31 HTML: \cvurl{https://colvars.github.io/colvars-refman-vmd/colvars-refman-vmd.html} \\
32 PDF: \cvurl{https://colvars.github.io/pdf/colvars-refman-vmd.pdf}\\
33
34 See section~\ref{sec:colvars_config_changes} for specific changes that affect compatibility between versions.
35 Please ask any usage questions through the VMD mailing list, and development questions through GitHub.
36
37 \subsection*{Overview}
38 }
39 \cvrefmanonly{
40 \cvsec{Overview}{sec:colvars_intro}
41 }
42
43 In molecular dynamics simulations, it is often useful to reduce the large number of degrees of freedom of a physical system into few parameters whose statistical distributions can be analyzed individually, or used to define biasing potentials to alter the dynamics of the system in a controlled manner.
44 These have been called `order parameters', `collective variables', `(surrogate) reaction coordinates', and many other terms.
45
46 Here we use primarily the term `collective variable', often shortened to \textit{colvar}, to indicate any differentiable function of atomic Cartesian coordinates, $\bm{x}_{i}$, with $i$ between $1$ and $N$, the total
47 number of atoms:
48 \begin{equation} 
49   \label{eq:colvar_basic}
50   \xi(t) \; = \xi(\bm{X}(t)) \; = \xi\left(\bm{x}_{i}(t), \bm{x}_{j}(t), \bm{x}_{k}(t),
51   \ldots \right)\;, \;\; 1 \leq i,j,k\ldots \leq N
52 \end{equation}
53 \cvvmdugonly{%
54 The Colvars module in VMD may be used to calculate these functions over a molecular structure, and to analyze the results of previous simulations.}
55 \cvrefmanonly{%
56 This manual documents the collective variables module (\textbf{Colvars}), a software that provides an implementation for the functions $\xi(\bm{X})$ with a focus on flexibility, robustness and high performance.}
57 The module is designed to perform multiple tasks concurrently during or after a simulation, the most common of which are:
58 \begin{itemize}
59
60 \item apply restraints or biasing potentials to multiple variables, tailored on the system by choosing from a wide set of basis functions, without limitations on their number or on the number of atoms involved; \cvnamdonly{while this can in principle be done through a TclForces script, using the Colvars module is both easier and computationally more efficient;}
61
62 \item calculate potentials of mean force (PMFs) along any set of variables, using different enhanced sampling methods, such as Adaptive Biasing Force (ABF), metadynamics, steered MD and umbrella sampling; variants of these methods that make use of an ensemble of replicas are supported as well;
63
64 \item calculate statistical properties of the variables, such as running averages and standard deviations, correlation functions of pairs of variables, and multidimensional histograms: this can be done either at run-time without the need to save very large trajectory files, or after a simulation has been completed using VMD and the \texttt{cv} command\cvnamdugonly{ or NAMD and the \texttt{coorfile read} command as illustrated in \ref{section:sample}}.
65
66 \end{itemize}
67
68 \cvvmdonly{\textbf{Note:} although restraints and PMF algorithms are primarily used during simulations, they are also available in VMD to test a new input for a simulation, or to evaluate the relative free energy of a new structure based on data from a previous calculation.  \emph{Options that only have an effect during a simulation are also included for compatibility purposes.}} 
69
70 Detailed explanations of the design of the Colvars module are provided in reference~\cite{Fiorin2013}. Please cite this reference whenever publishing work that makes use of this module.
71
72
73 \cvsec{A crash course}{sec:colvars_crash_course}
74
75 Suppose that we want to run a steered MD experiment where a small molecule is pulled away from a protein binding site.
76 In Colvars terms, this is done by applying a moving restraint to the distance between the two objects.
77 The configuration will contain two blocks, one defining the distance variable (see section \ref{sec:colvar} and \ref{sec:cvc_distance}), and the other the moving harmonic restraint (\ref{sec:colvarbias_harmonic}).
78
79 \bigskip
80 % verbatim can't appear within commands
81 {\noindent\ttfamily
82 \cvlammpsonly{indexFile index.ndx\\}colvar \{\\
83 \-~~name dist\\
84 \-~~distance \{\\
85 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbersRange 42-55 \}\\
86 \cvnamebasedonly{\-~~~~group2 \{\\
87 \-~~~~~~psfSegID  PR\\
88 \-~~~~~~atomNameResidueRange  CA 15-30\\
89 \-~~~~\}\\}
90 \cvlammpsonly{\-~~~~group2 \{ indexGroup C-alpha\_15-30 \}\\}
91 \-~~\}\\
92 \}\\
93 \\
94 harmonic \{\\
95 \-~~colvars dist\\
96 \-~~forceConstant 20.0\\
97 \-~~centers 4.0~~~~~~~~~\# initial distance\\
98 \-~~targetCenters 15.0~~\# final distance\\
99 \-~~targetNumSteps 500000\\
100 \}\\
101 }
102
103 Reading this input in plain English: the variable here named \emph{dist} consists in a distance function between the centers of two groups: the ligand (atoms 42 to 55) and the $\alpha$-carbon atoms of residues 15 to 30 in the protein \cvnamebasedonly{(segment name PR)}\cvlammpsonly{(selected from the index group ``\texttt{C-alpha\_15-30}'')}.
104 To the ``\emph{dist}'' variable, we apply a \texttt{harmonic} potential of force constant 20~\cvnamdonly{kcal/mol}\cvvmdonly{kcal/mol}\cvlammpsonly{(energy unit)}/\cvnamdonly{\AA}\cvvmdonly{\AA}\cvlammpsonly{(length unit)}$^2$, initially centered around a value of 4~\cvnamdonly{\AA}\cvvmdonly{\AA}\cvlammpsonly{(length unit)}, which will increase to 15~\cvnamdonly{\AA}\cvvmdonly{\AA}\cvlammpsonly{(length unit)} over 500,000 simulation steps.
105
106 The atom selection keywords is detailed in section \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups}.
107 \cvlammpsonly{If the selection is too complex to implement only via internal keywords, an external index file may be created following the NDX format used in GROMACS:\\
108 \url{http://manual.gromacs.org/documentation/current/user-guide/file-formats.html}\\
109 or by using the \texttt{group2ndx} LAMMPS command.}
110
111
112
113 \cvsec{General parameters}{sec:colvarmodule}
114
115 Here, we document the syntax of the commands and parameters used to set up and use the Colvars module in \MDENGINE{}.
116 One of these parameters is the configuration file or the configuration text for the module itself, whose syntax is described in \ref{sec:colvars_config_syntax} and in the following sections.
117
118
119 \cvnamdonly{
120 \cvsubsec{NAMD parameters}{sec:colvars_mdengine_params}
121
122 To enable a Colvars-based calculation, two parameters must be added to the NAMD configuration file, \texttt{colvars} and \texttt{colvarsConfig}.
123 An optional third parameter, \texttt{colvarsInput}, can be used to continue a previous simulation.
124
125 \begin{itemize}
126 %  \setlength{\itemsep}{0.4cm}
127
128 \item %
129   \keydef
130     {colvars}{%
131     NAMD configuration file}{%
132     Enable the Colvars module}{%
133     boolean}{%
134     \texttt{off}}{%
135     If this flag is on, the Colvars module within
136     NAMD is enabled; the module requires a separate configuration
137     file, to be provided with \texttt{colvarsConfig}.}
138
139 \item %
140   \key
141     {colvarsConfig}{%
142     NAMD configuration file}{%
143     Configuration file for the collective variables}{%
144     UNIX filename}{%
145     This file contains the definition of all collective variables and
146     their biasing or analysis methods.
147     This file can also be provided by the Tcl command \texttt{cv configfile}; alternatively, the contents of the file itself can be given as an argument to the command \texttt{cv config}.
148   }
149
150 \item %
151   \key
152     {colvarsInput}{%
153     NAMD configuration file}{%
154     Input state file for the collective variables}{%
155     UNIX filename}{%
156     When continuing a previous simulation run, this file contains the current state of all collective variables and of their associated algorithms.
157     It is written automatically at the end of any simulation with collective variables.
158     The step number contained by this file will be used internally by Colvars to control time-dependent biases, unless \texttt{firstTimestep} is given, in which case that value will be used.
159     This file can also be loaded with the Tcl command \texttt{cv load}.
160   }
161
162 \end{itemize}
163 }
164
165
166 \cvlammpsonly{
167 \subsection{LAMMPS keywords}
168 \label{sec:colvars_mdengine_parameters}
169
170 To enable a Colvars-based calculation, the following line must be added to the LAMMPS configuration file:\\
171 \\
172 \texttt{fix } \emph{ID } \texttt{all }  \texttt{colvars } \emph{configfile } \emph{keyword value pairs ...}\\
173 \\
174 where \emph{ID} is a string that uniquely identifies this fix command inside a LAMMPS script, \emph{configfile} is the name of the configuration file for the Colvars module, followed by one or more of the following optional keywords with their corresponding arguments:
175
176 \begin{itemize}
177
178 \item %
179   \key
180     {input}{%
181     Keyword of the \texttt{fix colvars} command}{%
182     Name or prefix of the input state file}{%
183     string}{%
184     If a value is provided, it is interpreted as either the name of the input state file, or as the prefix of the file named \emph{input}\texttt{.colvars.state}.
185     This file contains information needed to continue a previous collective variables-based calculation, including the number of the last computed step (useful for time-dependent biases).
186     The same information is also stored in the binary restart files written by LAMMPS, so this option is not needed when continuing a calculation from a LAMMPS restart.
187   }
188
189 \item %
190   \keydef
191     {output}{%
192     Keyword of the \texttt{fix colvars} command}{%
193     Prefix of the output state file}{%
194     string}{%
195     ``out''}{%
196     If a value is provided, it is interpreted as the prefix to all output files that will be written by the Colvars module (see \ref{sec:colvars_output}).}
197
198 \item %
199   \keydef
200     {unwrap}{%
201     keyword of the \texttt{fix colvars} command}{%
202     Whether to unwrap coordinates passed to the Colvars module}{%
203     ``yes'' or ``no''}{%
204     ``yes''}{%
205     This keyword controls whether wrapped or unwrapped coordinates are passed to the Colvars module for calculation of the collective variables and of the resulting forces. The default is to use the image flags to reconstruct the absolute atom positions: under this convention, centers of mass and centers of geometry are calculated as a weighted vector sum (see \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups_wrapping}).
206 Setting this to \emph{no} will use the current local coordinates that are wrapped back into the simulation cell at each re-neighboring instead.}
207
208 \item %
209   \keydef
210     {seed}{%
211     Keyword of the \texttt{fix colvars} command}{%
212     Seed for the random number generator}{%
213     positive integer}{%
214     1966}{%
215     If defined, the value of this keyword is provided as seed to the random number generator.
216     This is only meaningful when the \texttt{extendedLangevinDamping} keyword is used (see \ref{sec:colvar_extended}).}
217
218 \item %
219   \keydef
220     {tstat}{%
221     Keyword of the \texttt{fix colvars} command}{%
222     Thermostating fix}{%
223     string}{%
224     NULL}{%
225     This keyword provides the \emph{ID} of an applicable thermostating fix command. This will be used to provide the Colvars module with the current thermostat target temperature when using a method that needs this information.}
226
227 \end{itemize}
228
229 }
230
231
232 \cvscriptonly{
233 \cvsubsec{Using the \texttt{cv} command}{sec:cv_scripting}
234 \cvvmdugonly{\index{Colvars!\texttt{cv} command}}
235
236 At any moment during the execution of \MDENGINE{}, several options in the Colvars module can be read or modified by the command \texttt{cv} with the following syntax:\\
237 \noindent\texttt{cv~$<$subcommand$>$ [args...]}\\
238 \noindent{}For example, to record the value of a collective variable named \texttt{myVar} into the Tcl variable \texttt{value}, use the following syntax:\\
239 \noindent\texttt{set value [cv colvar myVar value]}\\
240 \noindent{}All subcommands of \texttt{cv} are documented below.
241
242 \cvvmdonly{
243 \textbf{Note:} in VMD, Colvars must be attached to one molecule (system).
244 Therefore, the \texttt{cv} command must be used for the first time as \texttt{cv molid }\emph{$<$molid$>$} to set up the Colvars module for the molecule identified by \emph{$<$molid$>$}.
245 In all following invocations, the \texttt{cv} command will continue operating on the same molecule, regardless of its ``top'' status.
246 To use the \texttt{cv} command on a different molecule, use \texttt{cv delete} first and then \texttt{cv molid }\emph{$<$molid$>$}.
247 Invoking the \texttt{cv} command with no arguments prints a help screen.
248 }
249
250 \cvvmdonly{
251 \cvsubsubsec{Example use of the \texttt{cv} command: analyze a trajectory}{sec:cv_command_example}
252
253 By far the most typical use of Colvars in VMD is computing the values of one or more variables along an existing trajectory:
254 \bigskip
255 {\noindent\ttfamily\\
256 \-{\bfseries\# Activate the module on the current VMD molecule}\\
257 \-cv molid top\\
258 \-{\bfseries\# Load a Colvars config file}\\
259 \-cv configfile test.in\\
260 \-set out [open "test.colvars.traj" "w"]\\
261 \-{\bfseries\# Write the labels to the file}\\
262 \-puts -nonewline \$\{out\} [cv printframelabels]\\
263 \-for \{ set fr 0 \} \{ \$\{fr\} < [molinfo top get numframes] \} \{ incr fr \} \{\\
264 \-~~{\bfseries\# Point Colvars to this trajectory frame}\\
265 \-~~cv frame \$\{fr\}\\
266 \-~~{\bfseries\# Recompute variables and biases}\\
267 \-~~cv update\\
268 \-~~{\bfseries\# Print variables and biases to the file}\\
269 \-~~puts -nonewline \$\{out\} [cv printframe]\\
270 \-\}\\
271 \-close \$\{out\}\\
272 }
273
274 The following sections explain the syntax of the various sub-commands of \texttt{cv}.
275 }
276
277
278 \cvsubsubsec{Managing the Colvars module}{sec:cv_command_general}
279
280 \begin{itemize}
281 \cvvmdonly{
282 \item \texttt{molid} \emph{$<$molid$>$}: setup the Colvars module for the given molecule; \emph{$<$molid$>$} is the identifier of a valid VMD molecule, either an integer or \texttt{top} for the top molecule;
283 \item \texttt{delete}: delete the Colvars module; after this, the module can be setup again using \texttt{cv molid};
284 }
285 \item \texttt{configfile} \emph{$<$file name$>$}: read configuration from a file;
286 \item \texttt{config} \emph{$<$string$>$}: read configuration from the given string; both \texttt{config} and \texttt{configfile} subcommands may be invoked multiple times;
287 \cvvmdonly{see \ref{sec:colvars_config_syntax} for the configuration syntax;}
288 \item \texttt{reset}: delete all internal configuration and atom selections of the Colvars module;
289 \item \texttt{version}: return the version of the Colvars module (see \ref{sec:colvars_config_changes} for any changes to older keywords).
290 \end{itemize}
291
292 \cvsubsubsec{Input and output commands}{sec:cv_command_io}
293
294 \begin{itemize}
295 \item \texttt{list}: return a list of all currently defined variables;
296 \cvvmdonly{See \ref{sec:colvar} and \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups} for how to configure a collective variable;}
297 \item \texttt{list biases}: return a list of all currently defined biases (i.e.~sampling and analysis algorithms);
298 \item \texttt{load} \emph{$<$file name$>$}: load a collective variables state file, typically produced during a previous simulation;
299   \cvvmdonly{this parameter requires that the corresponding configuration has already been loaded by \texttt{configfile} or \texttt{config}; see \ref{sec:colvars_output} for a brief description of this file; the contents of this file are not required for as long as the VMD molecule has valid coordinates and \texttt{cv update} is used;}
300   \cvnamdonly{the step number contained by this file will be used internally by Colvars to control time-dependent biases, unless \texttt{firstTimestep} is given, in which case that value will be used;}
301 \item \texttt{load} \emph{$<$prefix$>$}: same as above, but without the \texttt{.colvars.state} suffix;
302 \item \texttt{save} \emph{$<$prefix$>$}: save the current state in a file whose name begins with the given argument; if any of the biases have additional output files defined, those are saved as well using the same prefix;
303 \item \texttt{update}: recalculate all variables and biases based on the current atomic coordinates\cvnamdonly{ (this is typically not needed in NAMD, as these functions are called already during a timestep)};
304 \item \texttt{addenergy} \emph{$<$E$>$}: add value \emph{E} to the total bias energy; this can be used within \texttt{calc\_colvar\_forces};
305 \item \texttt{printframe}: return a summary of the current frame, in a format equivalent to a line of the collective variables trajectory file;
306 \item \texttt{printframelabels}: return text labels for the columns of \texttt{printframe}'s output;
307 \cvvmdonly{
308 \item \texttt{frame}: return the current frame number, from which colvar values are calculated;
309 \item \texttt{frame} \emph{$<$new frame$>$}: set the frame number; returns 0 if successful, nonzero if the requested frame does not exist.
310 }
311 \end{itemize}
312
313 \cvsubsubsec{Managing collective variables}{sec:cv_command_colvar}
314
315 \begin{itemize}
316 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{value}: return the current value of colvar \emph{$<$name$>$};
317 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{update}: recalculate colvar \emph{$<$name$>$};
318 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{type}: return the type of colvar \emph{$<$name$>$};
319 \cvvmdonly{
320 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{delete}: delete colvar \emph{$<$name$>$};
321 }
322 \cvnamdonly{
323 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{addforce} \emph{$<$F$>$}: apply given force on colvar \emph{$<$name$>$}; this can be used within \texttt{calc\_colvar\_forces}
324 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{getappliedforce}: get the force currently being applied on colvar \emph{$<$name$>$};
325 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{gettotalforce}: get the total force acting on colvar \emph{$<$name$>$} at the previous step (see \ref{sec:cvc_sys_forces});
326 }
327 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{getconfig}: return config string of colvar \emph{$<$name$>$}.
328 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{cvcflags} \emph{$<$flags$>$}: for a colvar with several CVCs (numbered according to their name string order), set which CVCs are enabled or disabled in subsequent evaluations according to a list of 0/1 flags (one per CVC).
329 \item \texttt{colvar} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{modifycvcs} \emph{$<$strings$>$}: for a colvar with one or more CVCs (numbered according to their name string order), pass a list of new configuration strings to modify each CVC without needing to delete the colvar.
330 This option is currently limited to changing the values of \refkey{componentCoeff}{sec:cvc_superp} and \refkey{componentExp}{sec:cvc_superp} (e.g.{} to update the polynomial superposition parameters on the fly), of \refkey{period}{sec:cvc_periodic} and \refkey{wrapAround}{sec:cvc_periodic} (e.g.{} to update the period of variables such as \texttt{distanceZ}), and of the \texttt{forceNoPBC} option for those CVCs that support it.
331 Changes in configuration done by this command are not saved to state files, and are lost when restarting a simulation, deleting the parent colvar, or resetting the module with \cvvmdonly{\texttt{cv delete} or} \texttt{cv reset}.
332
333 \end{itemize}
334
335 \cvsubsubsec{Managing biases}{sec:cv_command_bias}
336
337 \begin{itemize}
338 \item \texttt{bias} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{energy}: return the current energy of the bias \emph{$<$name$>$};
339 \item \texttt{bias} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{update}: recalculate the bias \emph{$<$name$>$};
340 \item \texttt{bias} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{delete}: delete the bias \emph{$<$name$>$};
341 \item \texttt{bias} \emph{$<$name$>$} \texttt{getconfig}: return config string of bias \emph{$<$name$>$}.
342 \end{itemize}
343
344 }
345
346
347 \cvsubsec{Configuration syntax}{sec:colvars_config_syntax}
348
349 \cvnamdonly{All the parameters defining variables and their biasing or analysis algorithms are read from the file specified by the configuration option \texttt{colvarsConfig}, or by the Tcl commands \texttt{cv config} and \texttt{cv configfile}.
350 \emph{None of the keywords described in the remainder of this manual are recognized directly in the NAMD configuration file, unless as arguments of \texttt{cv config}.}}
351 \cvvmdonly{The Colvars configuration is usually read using the commands \texttt{cv configfile} or \texttt{cv config}.}
352 The syntax of the Colvars configuration is ``\texttt{keyword value}'', where the keyword and its value are separated by any white space.
353 The following rules apply:
354
355 \begin{itemize}
356
357 \item keywords are case-insensitive (\texttt{upperBoundary} is the same as \texttt{upperboundary} and \texttt{UPPERBOUNDARY}): their string values are however case-sensitive (e.g.~file names);
358
359 \item a long value or a list of multiple values can be distributed across multiple lines by using curly braces, ``\texttt{\{}'' and ``\texttt{\}}'': the opening brace ``\texttt{\{}'' must occur on the same line as the keyword, following a space character or other white space; the closing brace ``\texttt{\}}'' can be at any position after that;
360
361 \item many keywords are nested, and are only meaningful within a specific context: for every keyword documented in the following, the ``parent'' keyword that defines such context is also indicated\cvnamdugonly{ in parentheses};
362
363 \cvnamdonly{%
364 \item the `\texttt{=}' sign between a keyword and its value, deprecated in the NAMD main configuration file, is not allowed;
365
366 \item Tcl syntax is generally not available, but it is possible to use Tcl variables or bracket expansion of commands within a configuration string, when this is passed via the command \texttt{cv config \ldots}; this is particularly useful when combined with parameter introspection\cvnamdugonly{ (see \ref{section:tclscripting})}, e.g.{} \texttt{cv config "colvarsTrajFrequency [DCDFreq]"};
367 }
368
369 \cvvmdonly{%
370 \item Tcl syntax is generally not available, but it is possible to use Tcl variables or bracket expansion of commands within a configuration string, when this is passed via the command \texttt{cv config \ldots}: for example, it is possible to convert the atom selection \$\emph{sel} into an atom group (see \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups_sel}) using \texttt{cv config "atomNumbers \{ [\$sel get serial] \}"};}
371
372 \item if a keyword requiring a boolean value (\texttt{yes|on|true} or \texttt{no|off|false}) is provided without an explicit value, it defaults to `\texttt{yes|on|true}'; for example, `\texttt{outputAppliedForce}' may be used as shorthand for `\texttt{outputAppliedForce on}';
373
374 \item the hash character \texttt{\#} indicates a comment: all text in the same line following this character will be ignored.
375
376 \end{itemize}
377
378
379 \cvsubsec{Global keywords}{sec:colvars_global}
380
381 The following keywords are available in the global context of the Colvars configuration, i.e.~they are not nested inside other keywords:
382 \begin{itemize}
383
384 \item %
385   \labelkey{Colvars-global|colvarsTrajFrequency}
386   \keydef
387     {colvarsTrajFrequency}{%
388     global}{%
389   Colvar value trajectory frequency}{%
390     positive integer}{%
391     \texttt{100}}{%
392     The values of each colvar (and of other related quantities, if requested) are written to the file \outputName\texttt{.colvars.traj} every these many steps throughout the simulation.
393     If the value is \texttt{0}, such trajectory file is not written.
394     For optimization the output is buffered, and synchronized with the disk only when the restart file is being written.}
395
396 \item %
397   \labelkey{Colvars-global|colvarsRestartFrequency}
398   \keydef
399     {colvarsRestartFrequency}{%
400     global}{%
401     Colvar module restart frequency}{%
402     positive integer}{%
403     \texttt{restartFreq}}{%
404     Allows to choose a different restart frequency for the Colvars module.
405     Redefining it may be useful to trace the time
406     evolution of those few properties which are not written to the
407     trajectory file for reasons of disk space.}
408
409 \item %
410   \labelkey{Colvars-global|indexFile}
411   \key
412     {indexFile}{%
413     global}{%
414     Index file for atom selection (GROMACS ``ndx'' format)}{%
415     UNIX filename}{%
416     This option reads an index file (usually with a \texttt{.ndx}
417     extension) as produced by the \texttt{make\_ndx} tool of GROMACS.
418     This keyword may be repeated to load multiple index files: the same group name cannot appear in multiple index files.
419     \cvlammpsonly{In LAMMPS, the \texttt{group2ndx} command can be used to generate such file from existing groups.
420     Note that the Colvars module reads the indices of atoms from the index file: therefore, the LAMMPS groups do not need to remain active during the simulation, and could be deleted right after issuing \texttt{group2ndx}.
421 }
422     The names of index groups contained in this file can then be used to define
423     atom groups with the \texttt{indexGroup} keyword.
424     Other supported methods to select atoms are described in \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups}.
425   }
426
427 \item %
428   \labelkey{Colvars-global|smp}
429   \keydef
430     {smp}{%
431     global}{%
432     Whether SMP parallelism should be used}{%
433     boolean}{%
434     \texttt{on}}{%
435     If this flag is enabled (default), SMP parallelism over threads will be used to compute variables and biases, provided that this is supported by the \MDENGINE{} build in use.}
436     
437 \end{itemize}
438
439
440 To illustrate the flexibility of the Colvars module, a non-trivial setup is represented in Figure~\ref{fig:colvars_diagram}.
441 The corresponding configuration is given below. The options within the \texttt{colvar} blocks are described in \ref{sec:colvar}, those within the \texttt{harmonic} and \texttt{histogram} blocks in \ref{sec:colvarbias}.
442 \textbf{Note:} \emph{except }\texttt{colvar}\emph{, none of the keywords shown is mandatory}.\\
443
444 \begin{figure}[!ht]
445   \centering
446 \cvnamdugonly{\includegraphics[width=12cm]{figures/colvars_diagram}}
447 \cvvmdugonly{\includegraphics[width=12cm]{pictures/colvars_diagram}}
448 \cvrefmanonly{\ifdefined\HCode{\HCode{<img class="diagram" src="colvars_diagram.png" alt="Colvars diagram">}}\else\includegraphics[width=12cm]{colvars_diagram}\fi}
449   \caption[Graphical representation of a Colvars configuration.]{Graphical representation of a Colvars configuration\cvlammpsonly{ \textbf{(note:} \emph{currently, the $\alpha$-helical content colvar is unavailable in LAMMPS)}}.
450     The colvar called ``$d$'' is defined as the difference between two distances: the first distance ($d_{1}$) is taken between the center of mass of atoms 1 and 2 and that of atoms 3 to 5, the second ($d_{2}$) between atom 7 and the center of mass of atoms 8 to 10.
451 The difference $d = d_{1} - d_{2}$ is obtained by multiplying the two by a coefficient $C = +1$ or $C = -1$, respectively.
452 The colvar called ``$c$'' is the coordination number calculated between atoms 1 to 10 and atoms 11 to 20.  A harmonic restraint is applied to both $d$ and $c$: to allow using the same force constant $K$, both $d$ and $c$ are scaled by their respective fluctuation widths $w_d$ and $w_c$.
453 \cvnamebasedonly{A third colvar ``alpha'' is defined as the $\alpha$-helical content of residues 1 to 10.}
454 The values of ``$c$''\cvnamebasedonly{ and ``alpha''} are also recorded throughout the simulation as a joint 2-dimensional histogram.
455 }
456   \label{fig:colvars_diagram}
457 \end{figure}
458
459 {%
460 % verbatim can't appear within commands
461 \noindent\ttfamily
462 colvar \{\\
463 \-~~\# difference of two distances\\
464 \-~~name d \\
465 \-~~width 0.2  \# 0.2 \AA{} of estimated fluctuation width \\
466 \-~~distance \{\\
467 \-~~~~componentCoeff  1.0\\
468 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbers 1 2 \}\\
469 \-~~~~group2 \{ atomNumbers 3 4 5 \}\\
470 \-~~\}\\
471 \-~~distance \{\\
472 \-~~~~componentCoeff -1.0\\
473 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbers 7 \}\\
474 \-~~~~group2 \{ atomNumbers 8 9 10 \}\\
475 \-~~\}\\
476 \}\\
477 \\
478 colvar \{\\
479 \-~~name c\\
480 \-~~coordNum \{\\
481 \-~~~~cutoff 6.0\\
482 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbersRange  1-10 \}\\
483 \-~~~~group2 \{ atomNumbersRange 11-20 \}\\
484 \-~~\}\\
485 \}\\}
486 \cvnamebasedonly{{%
487 \noindent\ttfamily\\
488 colvar \{\\
489 \-~~name alpha\\
490 \-~~alpha \{\\
491 \-~~~~psfSegID PROT\\
492 \-~~~~residueRange 1-10\\
493 \-~~\}\\
494 \}}}
495 {%
496 \noindent\ttfamily\\
497 \\
498 harmonic \{\\
499 \-~~colvars d c\\
500 \-~~centers 3.0 4.0\\
501 \-~~forceConstant 5.0\\
502 \}\\
503
504 \noindent histogram \{\\
505 \-~~colvars c\cvnamebasedonly{ alpha}\\
506 \}\\}
507
508 %\cvlammpsonly{\textbf{Note:} \emph{currently, the $\alpha$-helical content colvar is unavailable in LAMMPS, as it requires a name-based topology; future releases will overcome this limitation.}}
509
510 Section \ref{sec:colvar} explains how to define a colvar and its behavior, regardless of its specific functional form.
511 To define colvars that are appropriate to a specific physical system, Section \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups} documents how to select atoms, and section \ref{sec:colvar} lists all of the available functional forms, which we call ``colvar components''.
512 Finally, section \ref{sec:colvarbias} lists the available methods and algorithms to perform biased simulations and multidimensional analysis of colvars.
513
514
515 \cvsubsec{Output files}{sec:colvars_output}
516
517 During a simulation with collective variables defined, the following three output files are written:
518
519 \begin{itemize}
520
521 \item A \emph{state file}, named \outputName\texttt{.colvars.state}; this file is in ASCII (plain text) format\cvnamdonly{, regardless of the value of \texttt{binaryOutput} in the NAMD configuration}.  This file is written at the end of the specified run\cvscriptonly{, but can also be written at any time with the command \texttt{cv save} (\ref{sec:cv_command_io})}.\\
522   \emph{This is the only Colvars output file needed to continue a simulation.}
523
524 \item If the parameter \refkey{colvarsRestartFrequency}{Colvars-global|colvarsRestartFrequency} is larger than zero, a \emph{restart file} is written every that many steps: this file is fully equivalent to the final state file.
525   The name of this file is \restartName\texttt{.colvars.state}.
526
527 \item If the parameter \refkey{colvarsTrajFrequency}{Colvars-global|colvarsTrajFrequency} is greater than 0 (default: 100), a \emph{trajectory file} is written during the simulation: its name is \outputName\texttt{.colvars.traj}; unlike the state file, it is not needed to restart a simulation, but can be used later for post-processing and analysis.
528
529 \end{itemize}
530
531 Other output files may also be written by specific methods, e.g.{} the ABF or metadynamics methods (\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf}, \ref{sec:colvarbias_meta}).
532 Like the trajectory file, they are needed only for analyzing, not continuing a simulation.
533 All such files' names also begin with the prefix \outputName.
534
535 \cvnamdonly{Lastly, the total energy of all biases or restraints applied to the colvars appears under the NAMD standard output, under the MISC column.}
536
537
538 \cvsec{Defining collective variables}{sec:colvar}
539
540 A collective variable is defined by the keyword \texttt{colvar} followed by its configuration options contained within curly braces:
541
542 {\bigskip\noindent\ttfamily
543 colvar \{\\
544 \-~~name xi\\
545 \-~~$<$other options$>$\\
546 \-~~function\_name \{\\
547 \-~~~~$<$parameters$>$\\
548 \-~~~~$<$atom selection$>$\\
549 \-~~\}\\
550 \}\\
551 }
552
553 \noindent{}There are multiple ways of defining a variable:
554 \begin{itemize}
555 \item The \emph{simplest and most common way} way is using one of the precompiled functions (here called ``components''), which are listed in section~\ref{sec:cvc_list}.  For example, using the keyword \texttt{rmsd} (section \ref{sec:cvc_rmsd}) defines the variable as the root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of the selected atoms.
556 \item A new variable may also be constructed as a linear or polynomial combination of the components listed in section~\ref{sec:cvc_list} (see \ref{sec:cvc_superp} for details).
557 \cvleptononly{
558 \item A user-defined mathematical function of the existing components (see list in section~\ref{sec:cvc_list}), or of the atomic coordinates directly (see the \texttt{cartesian} keyword in \ref{sec:cvc_cartesian}).
559 The function is defined through the keyword \refkey{customFunction}{colvar|customFunction} (see \ref{sec:colvar_custom_function} for details).
560 }
561 \cvscriptonly{
562 \item A user-defined Tcl function of the existing components (see list in section~\ref{sec:cvc_list}), or of the atomic coordinates directly (see the \texttt{cartesian} keyword in \ref{sec:cvc_cartesian}).
563 The function is provided by a separate Tcl script, and referenced through the keyword \refkey{scriptedFunction}{colvar|scriptedFunction} (see \ref{sec:colvar_scripted} for details).
564 }
565 \end{itemize}
566 Choosing a component (function) is the only parameter strictly required to define a collective variable.
567 It is also highly recommended to specify a name for the variable:
568 \begin{itemize}
569 \label{sec:colvar_general}
570 \item %
571   \labelkey{colvar|name}
572   \keydef
573     {name}{%
574     \texttt{colvar}}{%
575     Name of this colvar}{%
576     string}{%
577     ``\texttt{colvar}'' + numeric id}{%
578     The name is an unique case-sensitive string which allows the
579     Colvars module to identify this colvar unambiguously; it is also
580     used in the trajectory file to label to the columns corresponding
581     to this colvar.}
582
583 \end{itemize}
584
585
586 \cvsubsec{Choosing a function}{sec:cvc_list}
587
588 In this context, the function that computes a colvar is called a \emph{component}.
589 A component's choice and definition consists of including in the variable's configuration a keyword indicating the type of function (e.g.{} \texttt{rmsd}), followed by a definition block specifying the atoms involved (see \ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups}) and any additional parameters (cutoffs, ``reference'' values, \ldots).
590 \emph{At least one component must be chosen to define a variable:} if none of the keywords listed below is found, an error is raised.
591
592 The following components implement functions with a scalar value (i.e.{} a real number):
593 \begin{itemize}
594 \item \refkey{distance}{colvar|distance}: distance between two groups;
595 \item \refkey{distanceZ}{colvar|distanceZ}: projection of a distance vector on an axis;
596 \item \refkey{distanceXY}{colvar|distanceXY}: projection of a distance vector on a plane;
597 \item \refkey{distanceInv}{colvar|distanceInv}: mean distance between two groups of atoms (e.g.~NOE-based distance);
598 \item \refkey{angle}{colvar|angle}: angle between three groups;
599 \item \refkey{dihedral}{colvar|dihedral}: torsional (dihedral) angle between four groups;
600 \item \refkey{dipoleAngle}{colvar|dipoleAngle}: angle between two groups and dipole of a third group;
601 \item \refkey{dipoleMagnitude}: magnitude of the dipole of a group of atoms;
602 \item \refkey{polarTheta}{colvar|polarTheta}: polar angle of a group in spherical coordinates;
603 \item \refkey{polarPhi}{colvar|polarPhi}: azimuthal angle of a group in spherical coordinates;
604 \item \refkey{coordNum}{colvar|coordNum}: coordination number between two groups;
605 \item \refkey{selfCoordNum}{colvar|selfCoordNum}: coordination number of atoms within a
606   group;
607 \item \refkey{hBond}{colvar|hBond}: hydrogen bond between two atoms;
608 \item \refkey{rmsd}{colvar|rmsd}: root mean square deviation (RMSD) from a set of
609   reference coordinates;
610 \item \refkey{eigenvector}{colvar|eigenvector}: projection of the atomic coordinates on a
611   vector;
612 \item \refkey{orientationAngle}{colvar|orientationAngle}: angle of the best-fit rotation from
613   a set of reference coordinates;
614 \item \refkey{orientationProj}{colvar|orientationProj}: cosine of \refkey{orientationProj}{colvar|orientationProj};
615 \item \refkey{spinAngle}{colvar|spinAngle}: projection orthogonal to an axis of the best-fit rotation
616   from a set of reference coordinates;
617 \item \refkey{tilt}{colvar|tilt}: projection on an axis of the best-fit rotation
618   from a set of reference coordinates;
619 \item \refkey{gyration}{colvar|gyration}: radius of gyration of a group of atoms;
620 \item \refkey{inertia}{colvar|inertia}: moment of inertia of a group of atoms;
621 \item \refkey{inertiaZ}{colvar|inertiaZ}: moment of inertia of a group of atoms around a chosen axis;
622 \cvnamebasedonly{
623 \item \refkey{alpha}{colvar|alpha}: $\alpha$-helix content of a protein segment.
624 \item \refkey{dihedralPC}{colvar|dihedralPC}: projection of protein backbone dihedrals onto a dihedral principal component.
625 }
626 \end{itemize}
627
628 Some components do not return scalar, but vector values:
629 \begin{itemize}
630 \item \refkey{distanceVec}{colvar|distanceVec}: distance vector between two groups (length: 3);
631 \item \refkey{distanceDir}{colvar|distanceDir}: unit vector parallel to distanceVec (length: 3);
632 \item \refkey{cartesian}{colvar|cartesian}: vector of atomic Cartesian coordinates (length: $N$ times the number of Cartesian components requested, X, Y or Z);
633 \item \refkey{distancePairs}{colvar|distancePairs}: vector of mutual distances (length: $N_{\mathrm{1}}\times{}N_{\mathrm{2}}$);
634 \item \refkey{orientation}{colvar|orientation}: best-fit rotation, expressed as a unit quaternion (length: 4).
635 \end{itemize}
636
637 The types of components used in a colvar (scalar or not) determine the
638 properties of that colvar, and particularly which biasing or analysis methods
639 can be applied.
640
641 \textbf{What if ``X'' is not listed?} If a function type is not available on this list, it may be possible to define it as a polynomial superposition of existing ones (see \ref{sec:cvc_superp})\cvleptononly{, a custom function (see \ref{sec:colvar_custom_function})}\cvscriptonly{, or a scripted function (see \ref{sec:colvar_scripted})}.
642
643 In the rest of this section, all available component types are listed, along with their physical units and the ranges of values, if limited.
644 Such limiting values can be used to define \refkey{lowerBoundary}{colvar|lowerBoundary} and \refkey{upperBoundary}{colvar|upperBoundary} in the parent colvar.
645
646 For each type of component, the available configurations keywords are listed:
647 when two components share certain keywords, the second component references to
648 the documentation of the first one that uses that keyword.
649 The very few keywords that are available for all types of components are listed in a separate section \ref{sec:cvc_common}.
650
651 \newenvironment{cvcoptions}%
652   {\noindent\textbf{List of keywords} (see also \ref{sec:cvc_superp} for additional options):
653   \begin{itemize}}
654   {
655   \end{itemize}
656 }
657
658 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distance}: center-of-mass distance between two groups.}{sec:cvc_distance}
659 \labelkey{colvar|distance}
660
661 The \texttt{distance \{...\}} block defines a distance component between the two atom groups, \texttt{group1} and \texttt{group2}.
662
663 \begin{cvcoptions}
664 \item %
665   \labelkey{colvar|distance|group1}
666   \key
667     {group1}{%
668     \texttt{distance}}{%
669     First group of atoms}{%
670     Block \texttt{group1 \{...\}}}{%
671     First group of atoms.}
672
673 \item %
674   \labelkey{colvar|distance|group2}
675   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{distance}}{group1}
676
677 \item %
678   \labelkey{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}
679   \keydef
680     {forceNoPBC}{%
681     \texttt{distance}}{%
682     Calculate absolute rather than minimum-image distance?}{%
683     boolean}{%
684     \texttt{no}}{%
685     By default, in calculations with periodic boundary conditions, the
686     \texttt{distance} component returns the distance according to the
687     minimum-image convention. If this parameter is set to \texttt{yes},
688     PBC will be ignored and the distance between the coordinates as maintained
689     internally will be used. This is only useful in a limited number of
690     special cases, e.g. to describe the distance between remote points
691     of a single macromolecule, which cannot be split across periodic cell
692     boundaries, and for which the minimum-image distance might give the
693     wrong result because of a relatively small periodic cell.}
694
695 \item %
696   \labelkey{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}
697   \keydef
698     {oneSiteTotalForce}{%
699     \texttt{angle}, \texttt{dipoleAngle}, \texttt{dihedral}}{%
700     Measure total force on group 1 only?}{%
701     boolean}{%
702     \texttt{no}}{%
703     If this is set to \texttt{yes}, the total force is measured along
704     a vector field (see equation~(\ref{eq:gradient_vector}) in
705     section~\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf}) that only involves atoms of
706     \texttt{group1}.  This option is only useful for ABF, or custom
707     biases that compute total forces.  See
708     section~\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf} for details.}
709
710 \end{cvcoptions}
711
712 The value returned is a positive number (in \AA), ranging from $0$
713 to the largest possible interatomic distance within the chosen
714 boundary conditions (with PBCs, the minimum image convention is used
715 unless the \texttt{forceNoPBC} option is set).
716
717
718 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distanceZ}: projection of a distance vector on an axis.}{sec:cvc_distanceZ}
719 \labelkey{colvar|distanceZ}
720
721 The \texttt{distanceZ~\{...\}} block defines a distance projection
722 component, which can be seen as measuring the distance between two
723 groups projected onto an axis, or the position of a group along such
724 an axis.  The axis can be defined using either one reference group and
725 a constant vector, or dynamically based on two reference groups.
726 One of the groups can be set to a dummy atom to allow the use of an absolute Cartesian coordinate.
727
728 \begin{cvcoptions}
729 \item %
730   \labelkey{colvar|distanceZ|main}
731   \key
732     {main}{%
733     \texttt{distanceZ}}{%
734     Main group of atoms}{%
735     Block \texttt{main \{...\}}}{%
736     Group of atoms whose position $\bm{r}$ is measured.}
737
738 \item %
739   \labelkey{colvar|distanceZ|ref}
740   \key
741     {ref}{%
742     \texttt{distanceZ}}{%
743     Reference group of
744     atoms}{%
745     Block \texttt{ref \{...\}}}{%
746     Reference group of atoms.  The position of its center of mass is
747     noted $\bm{r}_1$ below.}
748
749 \item %
750   \labelkey{colvar|distanceZ|ref2}
751   \keydef
752     {ref2}{%
753     \texttt{distanceZ}}{%
754     Secondary reference
755     group}{%
756     Block \texttt{ref2 \{...\}}}{%
757     none}{%
758     Optional group of reference atoms, whose position $\bm{r}_2$ can
759     be used to define a dynamic projection axis: $\bm{e}=(\| \bm{r}_2
760     - \bm{r}_1\|)^{-1} \times (\bm{r}_2 - \bm{r}_1)$.  In this case,
761     the origin is $\bm{r}_m = 1/2 (\bm{r}_1+\bm{r}_2)$, and the value
762     of the component is $\bm{e} \cdot (\bm{r}-\bm{r}_m)$.}
763
764 \item %
765   \labelkey{colvar|distanceZ|axis}
766   \keydef
767     {axis}{%
768     \texttt{distanceZ}}{%
769     Projection axis (\AA{})}{%
770     \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplet}{%
771     \texttt{(0.0, 0.0, 1.0)}}{%
772     The three components of this vector define a
773     projection axis $\bm{e}$ for the distance vector $\bm{r} -
774     \bm{r}_1$ joining the centers of groups \texttt{ref} and
775     \texttt{main}. The value of the component is then $\bm{e} \cdot
776     (\bm{r}-\bm{r}_1)$.  The vector should be written as three
777     components separated by commas and enclosed in parentheses.}
778
779 \item %
780   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distanceZ}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
781
782 \item %
783   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distanceZ}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
784 \end{cvcoptions}
785 This component returns a number (in \AA{}) whose range is determined
786 by the chosen boundary conditions.  For instance, if the $z$ axis is
787 used in a simulation with periodic boundaries, the returned value ranges
788 between $-b_{z}/2$ and $b_{z}/2$, where $b_{z}$ is the box length
789 along $z$ (this behavior is disabled if \texttt{forceNoPBC} is set).
790
791
792 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distanceXY}: modulus of the projection of a distance vector on a plane.}{sec:cvc_distanceXY}
793 \labelkey{colvar|distanceXY}
794
795 The \texttt{distanceXY~\{...\}} block defines a distance projected on
796 a plane, and accepts the same keywords as the component \texttt{distanceZ}, i.e.
797 \texttt{main}, \texttt{ref}, either \texttt{ref2} or \texttt{axis},
798 and \texttt{oneSiteTotalForce}.  It returns the norm of the
799 projection of the distance vector between \texttt{main} and
800 \texttt{ref} onto the plane orthogonal to the axis.  The axis is
801 defined using the \texttt{axis} parameter or as the vector joining
802 \texttt{ref} and \texttt{ref2} (see \texttt{distanceZ} above).
803
804 \begin{cvcoptions}
805 \item %
806   \dupkey{main}{\texttt{distanceXY}}{colvar|distanceZ|main}{\texttt{distanceZ} component}
807 \item %
808   \dupkey{ref}{\texttt{distanceXY}}{colvar|distanceZ|ref}{\texttt{distanceZ} component}
809 \item %
810   \dupkey{ref2}{\texttt{distanceXY}}{colvar|distanceZ|ref2}{\texttt{distanceZ} component}
811 \item %
812   \dupkey{axis}{\texttt{distanceXY}}{colvar|distanceZ|axis}{\texttt{distanceZ} component}
813 \item %
814   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distanceXY}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
815 \item %
816   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distanceZ}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
817 \end{cvcoptions}
818
819
820
821 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distanceVec}: distance vector  between two groups.}{sec:cvc_distanceVec}
822 \labelkey{colvar|distanceVec}
823
824 The \texttt{distanceVec~\{...\}} block defines
825 a distance vector component, which accepts the same keywords as
826 the component \texttt{distance}: \texttt{group1}, \texttt{group2}, and
827 \texttt{forceNoPBC}. Its value is the 3-vector joining the centers
828 of mass of \texttt{group1} and \texttt{group2}.
829
830 \begin{cvcoptions}
831 \item %
832   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{distanceVec}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
833 \item %
834   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{distanceVec}}{group1}
835 \item %
836   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distanceVec}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
837 \item %
838   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distanceVec}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
839 \end{cvcoptions}
840
841
842
843 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distanceDir}: distance unit vector between two groups.}{sec:cvc_distanceDir}
844 \labelkey{colvar|distanceDir}
845
846 The \texttt{distanceDir~\{...\}} block defines
847 a distance unit vector component, which accepts the same keywords as
848 the component \texttt{distance}: \texttt{group1}, \texttt{group2}, and
849 \texttt{forceNoPBC}.  It returns a
850 3-dimensional unit vector $\mathbf{d} = (d_{x}, d_{y}, d_{z})$, with
851 $|\mathbf{d}| = 1$.
852
853 \begin{cvcoptions}
854 \item %
855   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{distanceDir}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
856 \item %
857   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{distanceDir}}{group1}
858 \item %
859   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distanceDir}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
860 \item %
861   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distanceDir}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
862 \end{cvcoptions}
863
864
865 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distanceInv}: mean distance between two groups of atoms.}{sec:cvc_distanceInv}
866 \labelkey{colvar|distanceInv}
867
868 The \texttt{distanceInv~\{...\}} block defines a generalized mean distance between two groups of atoms 1 and 2, weighted with exponent $1/n$:
869 \begin{equation}
870   \label{eq:distanceInv}
871   d_{\mathrm{1,2}}^{[n]} \; = \;   \left(\frac{1}{N_{\mathrm{1}}N_{\mathrm{2}}}\sum_{i,j} \left(\frac{1}{\Vert\mathbf{d}^{ij}\Vert}\right)^{n} \right)^{-1/n}
872 \end{equation}
873 where $\Vert\mathbf{d}^{ij}\Vert$ is the distance between atoms $i$ and $j$ in groups 1 and 2 respectively, and $n$ is an even integer.
874
875 \begin{cvcoptions}
876 \item %
877   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{distanceInv}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
878 \item %
879   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{distanceInv}}{group1}
880 \item %
881   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distanceInv}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
882 \item %
883   \keydef
884     {exponent}{%
885     \texttt{distanceInv}}{%
886     Exponent $n$ in equation~\ref{eq:distanceInv}}{%
887     positive even integer}{%
888     6}{Defines the exponent to which the individual distances are elevated before averaging.  The default value of 6 is useful for example to applying restraints based on NOE-measured distances.}
889 \end{cvcoptions}
890 This component returns a number in \AA{}, ranging from $0$ to the largest possible distance within the chosen boundary conditions.
891
892
893 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{distancePairs}: set of pairwise distances between two groups.}{sec:cvc_distancePairs}
894 \labelkey{colvar|distancePairs}
895
896 The \texttt{distancePairs~\{...\}} block defines a $N_{\mathrm{1}}\times{}N_{\mathrm{2}}$-dimensional variable that includes all mutual distances between the atoms of two groups.
897 This can be useful, for example, to develop a new variable defined over two groups, by using the \texttt{scriptedFunction} feature.
898
899 \begin{cvcoptions}
900 \item %
901   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{distancePairs}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
902 \item %
903   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{distancePairs}}{group1}
904 \item %
905   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distancePairs}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
906 \end{cvcoptions}
907 This component returns a $N_{\mathrm{1}}\times{}N_{\mathrm{2}}$-dimensional vector of numbers, each ranging from $0$ to the largest possible distance within the chosen boundary conditions.
908
909
910 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{cartesian}: vector of atomic Cartesian coordinates.}{sec:cvc_cartesian}
911 \labelkey{colvar|cartesian}
912
913 The \texttt{cartesian~\{...\}} block defines a component returning a flat vector containing
914 the Cartesian coordinates of all participating atoms, in the order
915 $(x_1, y_1, z_1, \cdots, x_n, y_n, z_n)$.
916
917 \begin{cvcoptions}
918 \item %
919   \key
920     {atoms}{%
921     \texttt{cartesian}}{%
922     Group of atoms}{%
923     Block \texttt{atoms \{...\}}}{%
924     Defines the atoms whose coordinates make up the value of the component.
925     If \texttt{rotateReference} or \texttt{centerReference} are defined, coordinates
926     are evaluated within the moving frame of reference.}
927 \end{cvcoptions}
928
929
930 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{angle}: angle between three groups.}{sec:cvc_angle}
931 \labelkey{colvar|angle}
932
933 The \texttt{angle~\{...\}} block defines an angle, and contains the
934 three blocks \texttt{group1}, \texttt{group2} and \texttt{group3}, defining
935 the three groups.  It returns an angle (in degrees) within the
936 interval $[0:180]$.
937
938 \begin{cvcoptions}
939 \item %
940   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{angle}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
941 \item %
942   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{angle}}{group1}
943 \item %
944   \simkey{group3}{\texttt{angle}}{group1}
945 \item %
946   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{angle}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
947 \item %
948   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{angle}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
949 \end{cvcoptions}
950
951
952
953 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{dipoleAngle}: angle between two groups and dipole of a third group.}{sec:cvc_dipoleAngle}
954 \labelkey{colvar|dipoleAngle}
955
956 The \texttt{dipoleAngle~\{...\}} block defines an angle, and contains the
957 three blocks \texttt{group1}, \texttt{group2} and \texttt{group3}, defining
958 the three groups, being \texttt{group1} the group where dipole is calculated. 
959 It returns an angle (in degrees) within the interval $[0:180]$.
960
961 \begin{cvcoptions}
962 \item %
963   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{dipoleAngle}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
964 \item %
965   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{dipoleAngle}}{group1}
966 \item %
967   \simkey{group3}{\texttt{dipoleAngle}}{group1}
968 \item %
969   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{dipoleAngle}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
970 \item %
971   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{dipoleAngle}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
972 \end{cvcoptions}
973
974
975 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{dihedral}: torsional angle between four groups.}{sec:cvc_dihedral}
976 \labelkey{colvar|dihedral}
977
978 The \texttt{dihedral~\{...\}} block defines a torsional angle, and
979 contains the blocks \texttt{group1}, \texttt{group2}, \texttt{group3}
980 and \texttt{group4}, defining the four groups.  It returns an angle
981 (in degrees) within the interval $[-180:180]$.  The Colvars module
982 calculates all the distances between two angles taking into account
983 periodicity.  For instance, reference values for restraints or range
984 boundaries can be defined by using any real number of choice.
985
986 \begin{cvcoptions}
987 \item %
988   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{dihedral}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
989 \item %
990   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{dihedral}}{group1}
991 \item %
992   \simkey{group3}{\texttt{dihedral}}{group1}
993 \item %
994   \simkey{group4}{\texttt{dihedral}}{group1}
995 \item %
996   \dupkey{forceNoPBC}{\texttt{dihedral}}{colvar|distance|forceNoPBC}{\texttt{distance} component}
997 \item %
998   \dupkey{oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{dihedral}}{colvar|distance|oneSiteTotalForce}{\texttt{distance} component}
999 \end{cvcoptions}
1000
1001
1002 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{polarTheta}: polar angle in spherical coordinates.}{sec:cvc_polarTheta}
1003 \labelkey{colvar|polarTheta}
1004
1005 The \texttt{polarTheta~\{...\}} block defines the polar angle in
1006 spherical coordinates, for the center of mass of a group of atoms 
1007 described by the block \texttt{atoms}.  It returns an angle
1008 (in degrees) within the interval $[0:180]$.
1009 To obtain spherical coordinates in a frame of reference tied to
1010 another group of atoms, use the \texttt{fittingGroup} (\ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups_ref_frame}) option
1011 within the \texttt{atoms} block.
1012 An example is provided in file \texttt{examples/11\_polar\_angles.in} of the Colvars public repository.
1013
1014 \begin{cvcoptions}
1015 \item %
1016   \labelkey{colvar|polarTheta|atoms}
1017   \key
1018     {atoms}{%
1019     \texttt{polarPhi}}{%
1020     Atom group}{%
1021     \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block}{%
1022     Defines the group of atoms for the COM of which the angle should be calculated.
1023     }
1024 \end{cvcoptions}
1025
1026
1027 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{polarPhi}: azimuthal angle in spherical coordinates.}{sec:cvc_polarPhi}
1028 \labelkey{colvar|polarPhi}
1029
1030 The \texttt{polarPhi~\{...\}} block defines the azimuthal angle in
1031 spherical coordinates, for the center of mass of a group of atoms 
1032 described by the block \texttt{atoms}. It returns an angle
1033 (in degrees) within the interval $[-180:180]$.  The Colvars module
1034 calculates all the distances between two angles taking into account
1035 periodicity.  For instance, reference values for restraints or range
1036 boundaries can be defined by using any real number of choice.
1037 To obtain spherical coordinates in a frame of reference tied to
1038 another group of atoms, use the \texttt{fittingGroup} (\ref{sec:colvar_atom_groups_ref_frame}) option
1039 within the \texttt{atoms} block.
1040 An example is provided in file \texttt{examples/11\_polar\_angles.in} of the Colvars public repository.
1041
1042
1043 \begin{cvcoptions}
1044 \item %
1045   \labelkey{colvar|polarPhi|atoms}
1046   \key
1047     {atoms}{%
1048     \texttt{polarPhi}}{%
1049     Atom group}{%
1050     \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block}{%
1051     Defines the group of atoms for the COM of which the angle should be calculated.
1052     }
1053 \end{cvcoptions}
1054
1055
1056 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{coordNum}: coordination number between two groups.}{sec:cvc_coordNum}
1057 \labelkey{colvar|coordNum}
1058
1059 The \texttt{coordNum \{...\}} block defines
1060 a coordination number (or number of contacts), which calculates the
1061 function $(1-(d/d_0)^{n})/(1-(d/d_0)^{m})$, where $d_0$ is the
1062 ``cutoff'' distance, and $n$ and $m$ are exponents that can control
1063 its long range behavior and stiffness \cite{Iannuzzi2003}.  This
1064 function is summed over all pairs of atoms in \texttt{group1} and
1065 \texttt{group2}:
1066 \begin{equation}
1067   \label{eq:cvc_coordNum}
1068   C (\mathtt{group1}, \mathtt{group2}) \; = \; 
1069   \sum_{i\in\mathtt{group1}}\sum_{j\in\mathtt{group2}} {
1070     \frac{1 - (|\mathbf{x}_{i}-\mathbf{x}_{j}|/d_{0})^{n}}{
1071       1 - (|\mathbf{x}_{i}-\mathbf{x}_{j}|/d_{0})^{m} }
1072   }
1073 \end{equation}
1074
1075 \begin{cvcoptions}
1076
1077 \item %
1078   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|group1}
1079   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{coordNum}}{colvar|distance|group1}{\texttt{distance} component}
1080
1081 \item %
1082   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|group2}
1083   \simkey{group2}{\texttt{coordNum}}{group1}
1084
1085 \item %
1086   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|cutoff}
1087   \keydef
1088     {cutoff}{%
1089     \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1090     ``Interaction'' distance (\AA)}{%
1091     positive decimal}{%
1092     4.0}{%
1093     This number defines the switching distance to define an
1094     interatomic contact: for $d \ll d_0$, the switching function
1095     $(1-(d/d_0)^{n})/(1-(d/d_0)^{m})$ is close to 1, at $d = d_0$ it
1096     has a value of $n/m$ ($1/2$ with the default $n$ and $m$), and at
1097     $d \gg d_0$ it goes to zero approximately like $d^{m-n}$.  Hence,
1098     for a proper behavior, $m$ must be larger than $n$.}
1099
1100 \item %
1101   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|cutoff3}
1102   \keydef
1103     {cutoff3}{%
1104     \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1105     Reference distance vector (\AA)}{%
1106     ``\texttt{(x, y, z)}'' triplet of positive decimals}{%
1107     \texttt{(4.0, 4.0, 4.0)}}{%
1108     The three components of this vector define three different cutoffs
1109     $d_{0}$ for each direction.  This option is mutually exclusive with
1110     \texttt{cutoff}.}
1111
1112 \item %
1113   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|expNumer}
1114   \keydef
1115     {expNumer}{%
1116     \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1117     Numerator exponent}{%
1118     positive even integer}{%
1119     6}{%
1120     This number defines the $n$ exponent for the switching function.}
1121
1122 \item %
1123   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|expDenom}
1124   \keydef
1125     {expDenom}{%
1126     \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1127     Denominator exponent}{%
1128     positive even integer}{%
1129     12}{%
1130     This number defines the $m$ exponent for the switching function.}
1131
1132 \item %
1133   \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|group2CenterOnly}
1134   \keydef
1135     {group2CenterOnly}{%
1136     \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1137     Use only \texttt{group2}'s center of
1138     mass}{%
1139     boolean}{%
1140     \texttt{off}}{%
1141     If this option is \texttt{on}, only contacts between each atoms in \texttt{group1} and the center of mass of     \texttt{group2} are calculated (by default, the sum extends over all pairs of atoms in \texttt{group1} and \texttt{group2}).
1142 If \texttt{group2} is a \texttt{dummyAtom}, this option is set to \texttt{yes} by default.
1143 }
1144
1145 \item %
1146     \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|tolerance}
1147     \keydef
1148      {tolerance}{%
1149      \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1150      Pairlist control}{%
1151     decimal}{%
1152     0.0}{This controls the pairlist feature, dictating the minimum value for each summation element in Eq.~\ref{eq:cvc_coordNum} such that the pair that contributed the summation element is included in subsequent simulation timesteps until the next pairlist recalculation. For most applications, this value should be small (eg. 0.001) to avoid missing important contributions to the overall sum. Higher values will improve performance by reducing the number of pairs that contribute to the sum. Values above 1 will exclude all possible pair interactions. Similarly, values below 0 will never exclude a pair from consideration. To ensure continuous forces, Eq.~\ref{eq:cvc_coordNum} is further modified by subtracting the tolerance and then rescaling so that each pair covers the range $\left[0, 1\right]$.
1153   }
1154
1155 \item %
1156     \labelkey{colvar|coordNum|pairListFrequency}
1157     \keydef
1158      {pairListFrequency}{%
1159      \texttt{coordNum}}{%
1160      Pairlist regeneration frequency}{%
1161     positive integer}{%
1162     100}{This controls the pairlist feature, dictating how many steps are taken between regenerating pairlists if the tolerance is greater than 0.
1163   }
1164 \end{cvcoptions}
1165
1166 This component returns a dimensionless number, which ranges from
1167 approximately 0 (all interatomic distances are much larger than the
1168 cutoff) to $N_{\mathtt{group1}} \times N_{\mathtt{group2}}$ (all distances
1169 are less than the cutoff), or $N_{\mathtt{group1}}$ if
1170 \texttt{group2CenterOnly} is used.  For performance reasons, at least
1171 one of \texttt{group1} and \texttt{group2} should be of limited size or \texttt{group2CenterOnly} should be used: the cost of the loop over all pairs grows as $N_{\mathtt{group1}} \times N_{\mathtt{group2}}$.
1172 Setting $\mathtt{tolerance} > 0$ ameliorates this to some degree, although every pair is still checked to regenerate the pairlist.
1173
1174
1175
1176 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{selfCoordNum}: coordination number between atoms within a group.}{sec:cvc_selfCoordNum}
1177 \labelkey{colvar|selfCoordNum}
1178
1179 The \texttt{selfCoordNum \{...\}} block defines
1180 a coordination number similarly to the component \texttt{coordNum},
1181 but the function is summed over atom pairs within \texttt{group1}:
1182 \begin{equation}
1183   \label{eq:cvc_selfCoordNum}
1184   C (\mathtt{group1}) \; = \; 
1185   \sum_{i\in\mathtt{group1}}\sum_{j > i} {
1186     \frac{1 - (|\mathbf{x}_{i}-\mathbf{x}_{j}|/d_{0})^{n}}{
1187       1 - (|\mathbf{x}_{i}-\mathbf{x}_{j}|/d_{0})^{m} }
1188   }
1189 \end{equation}
1190 The keywords accepted by \texttt{selfCoordNum} are a subset of
1191 those accepted by \texttt{coordNum}, namely \texttt{group1}
1192 (here defining \emph{all} of the atoms to be considered),
1193 \texttt{cutoff}, \texttt{expNumer}, and \texttt{expDenom}.
1194
1195 \begin{cvcoptions}
1196 \item %
1197   \dupkey{group1}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|group1}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1198 \item %
1199   \dupkey{cutoff}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|cutoff}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1200 \item %
1201   \dupkey{cutoff3}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|cutoff3}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1202 \item %
1203   \dupkey{expNumer}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|expNumer}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1204 \item %
1205   \dupkey{expDenom}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|expDenom}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1206 \item %
1207   \dupkey{tolerance}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|tolerance}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1208 \item %
1209   \dupkey{pairListFrequency}{\texttt{selfCoordNum}}{colvar|coordNum|pairListFrequency}{\texttt{coordNum} component}
1210 \end{cvcoptions}
1211
1212 This component returns a dimensionless number, which ranges from
1213 approximately 0 (all interatomic distances much larger than the
1214 cutoff) to $N_{\mathtt{group1}} \times (N_{\mathtt{group1}} - 1) / 2$ (all
1215 distances within the cutoff).  For performance reasons,
1216 \texttt{group1} should be of limited size, because the cost of the
1217 loop over all pairs grows as $N_{\mathtt{group1}}^2$.
1218
1219
1220
1221 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{hBond}: hydrogen bond between two atoms.}{sec:cvc_hBond}
1222 \labelkey{colvar|hBond}
1223
1224 The \texttt{hBond \{...\}} block defines a hydrogen
1225 bond, implemented as a coordination number (eq.~\ref{eq:cvc_coordNum})
1226 between the donor and the acceptor atoms.  Therefore, it accepts the
1227 same options \texttt{cutoff} (with a different default value of
1228 3.3~\AA{}), \texttt{expNumer} (with a default value of 6) and
1229 \texttt{expDenom} (with a default value of 8).  Unlike
1230 \texttt{coordNum}, it requires two atom numbers, \texttt{acceptor} and
1231 \texttt{donor}, to be defined.  It returns an adimensional number,
1232 with values between 0 (acceptor and donor far outside the cutoff
1233 distance) and 1 (acceptor and donor much closer than the cutoff).
1234
1235 \begin{cvcoptions}
1236 \item %
1237   \key
1238     {acceptor}{%
1239     \texttt{hBond}}{%
1240     Number of the acceptor atom}{%
1241     positive integer}{%
1242     Number that uses the same convention as \texttt{atomNumbers}.}
1243 \item %
1244   \simkey{donor}{\texttt{hBond}}{acceptor}
1245 \item %
1246   \dupkey{cutoff}{\texttt{hBond}}{colvar|coordNum|cutoff}{\texttt{coordNum} component}\\
1247   \textbf{Note:} default value is 3.3~\AA.
1248 \item %
1249   \dupkey{expNumer}{\texttt{hBond}}{colvar|coordNum|expNumer}{\texttt{coordNum} component}\\
1250   \textbf{Note:} default value is 6.
1251 \item %
1252   \dupkey{expDenom}{\texttt{hBond}}{colvar|coordNum|expDenom}{\texttt{coordNum} component}\\
1253   \textbf{Note:} default value is 8.
1254 \end{cvcoptions}
1255
1256
1257 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{rmsd}: root mean square displacement (RMSD) from reference positions.}{sec:cvc_rmsd}
1258 \labelkey{colvar|rmsd}
1259
1260 The block \texttt{rmsd~\{...\}} defines the root mean square replacement
1261 (RMSD) of a group of atoms with respect to a reference structure.  For
1262 each set of coordinates $\{ \mathbf{x}_1(t), \mathbf{x}_2(t), \ldots
1263 \mathbf{x}_N(t) \}$, the colvar component \texttt{rmsd} calculates the
1264 optimal rotation
1265 $U^{\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}\rightarrow\{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}}$
1266 that best superimposes the coordinates $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}$ onto a
1267 set of reference coordinates $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}$.
1268 Both the current and the reference coordinates are centered on their
1269 centers of geometry, $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)$ and
1270 $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}$.  The root mean square
1271 displacement is then defined as:
1272 \begin{equation}
1273   \label{eq:cvc_rmsd}
1274   { \mathrm{RMSD}(\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\},
1275     \{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}) } \; = \; \sqrt{
1276     \frac{1}{N} \sum_{i=1}^{N} \left|
1277       U
1278       \left(\mathbf{x}_{i}(t) - \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)\right) -
1279       \left(\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}} -
1280         \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}^{\mathrm{(ref)}} \right) \right|^{2} }
1281 \end{equation}
1282 The optimal rotation
1283 $U^{\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}\rightarrow\{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}}$
1284 is calculated within the formalism developed in
1285 reference~\cite{Coutsias2004}, which guarantees a continuous
1286 dependence of
1287 $U^{\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}\rightarrow\{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}}$
1288 with respect to $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}$.
1289
1290 \begin{cvcoptions}
1291
1292 \item %
1293   \labelkey{colvar|rmsd|atoms}
1294   \key
1295     {atoms}{%
1296     \texttt{rmsd}}{%
1297     Atom group}{%
1298     \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block}{%
1299     Defines the group of atoms of which the RMSD should be calculated.
1300     Optimal fit options (such as \texttt{refPositions} and
1301     \texttt{rotateReference}) should typically NOT be set within this
1302     block. Exceptions to this rule are the special cases discussed in
1303     the \emph{Advanced usage} paragraph below.
1304     }
1305
1306 \item %
1307   \labelkey{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}
1308   \key
1309     {refPositions}{%
1310     \texttt{rmsd}}{%
1311     Reference coordinates}{%
1312     space-separated list of \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplets}{%
1313     This option (mutually exclusive with \texttt{refPositionsFile}) sets the reference coordinates for RMSD calculation, and uses these to compute the roto-translational fit.  
1314     It is functionally equivalent to the option \refkey{refPositions}{atom-group|refPositions} in the atom group definition, which also supports more advanced fitting options.
1315     }
1316
1317 \item %
1318   \labelkey{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}
1319   \key
1320     {refPositionsFile}{%
1321     \texttt{rmsd}}{%
1322     Reference coordinates file}{%
1323     UNIX filename}{%
1324     This option (mutually exclusive with \texttt{refPositions}) sets the reference coordinates for RMSD calculation, and uses these to compute the roto-translational fit.  
1325     It is functionally equivalent to the option \refkey{refPositionsFile}{atom-group|refPositionsFile} in the atom group definition, which also supports more advanced fitting options.
1326     }
1327
1328 \cvnamebasedonly{
1329 \item %
1330   \labelkey{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}
1331   \key
1332     {refPositionsCol}{%
1333     \texttt{rmsd}}{%
1334     PDB column containing atom flags}{%
1335     \texttt{O}, \texttt{B}, \texttt{X}, \texttt{Y}, or \texttt{Z}}{%
1336     If \texttt{refPositionsFile} is a PDB file that contains all the atoms in the topology, this option may be provided to set which PDB field is used to flag the reference coordinates for \texttt{atoms}.
1337   }
1338
1339 \item %
1340   \labelkey{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}
1341   \key
1342     {refPositionsColValue}{%
1343     \texttt{rmsd}}{%
1344     Atom selection flag in the PDB column}{%
1345     positive decimal}{%
1346     If defined, this value identifies in the PDB column
1347     \texttt{refPositionsCol} of the file \texttt{refPositionsFile}
1348     which atom positions are to be read.  Otherwise, all positions
1349     with a non-zero value are read.
1350   }
1351 }
1352 \end{cvcoptions}
1353 This component returns a positive real number (in \AA).
1354
1355
1356 \cvsubsubsec{Advanced usage of the \texttt{rmsd} component.}{sec:cvc_rmsd_advanced}
1357 In the standard usage as described above, the \texttt{rmsd} component
1358 calculates a minimum RMSD, that is, current coordinates are optimally
1359 fitted onto the same reference coordinates that are used to 
1360 compute the RMSD value. The fit itself is handled by the atom group
1361 object, whose parameters are automatically set by the \texttt{rmsd}
1362 component.
1363 For very specific applications, however, it may be
1364 useful to control the fitting process separately from the definition
1365 of the reference coordinates, to evaluate various types of
1366 non-minimal RMSD values. This can be achieved by setting the
1367 related options (\texttt{refPositions}, etc.) explicitly in the
1368 atom group block. This allows for the following non-standard cases:
1369
1370 \begin{enumerate}
1371 \item applying the optimal translation, but no rotation
1372 (\texttt{rotateReference off}), to bias or restrain the shape and
1373 orientation, but not the position of the atom group;
1374 \item applying the optimal rotation, but no translation
1375 (\texttt{translateReference off}), to bias or restrain the shape and
1376 position, but not the orientation of the atom group;
1377 \item disabling the application of optimal roto-translations, which
1378 lets the RMSD component decribe the deviation of atoms
1379 from fixed positions in the laboratory frame: this allows for custom
1380 positional restraints within the Colvars module;
1381 \item fitting the atomic positions to different reference coordinates
1382 than those used in the RMSD calculation itself;
1383 \item applying the optimal rotation and/or translation from a separate
1384 atom group, defined through \texttt{fittingGroup}: the RMSD then
1385 reflects the deviation from reference coordinates in a separate, moving
1386 reference frame.
1387 \end{enumerate}
1388
1389
1390 \cvscriptonly{
1391 \cvsubsubsec{Path collective variables}{sec:pathcv}
1392
1393 An application of the \texttt{rmsd} component is "path collective variables",\cite{Branduardi2007}
1394 which are implemented as Tcl-scripted combinations or RMSDs.
1395 The implementation is available as file \texttt{colvartools/pathCV.tcl}, and
1396 an example is provided in file \texttt{examples/10\_pathCV.namd} of the Colvars public repository.}
1397
1398
1399 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{eigenvector}: projection of the atomic  coordinates on a vector.}{sec:cvc_eigenvector}
1400 \labelkey{colvar|eigenvector}
1401
1402 The block \texttt{eigenvector~\{...\}} defines the projection of the coordinates
1403 of a group of atoms (or more precisely, their deviations from the
1404 reference coordinates) onto a vector in $\mathbb{R}^{3n}$, where $n$ is the
1405 number of atoms in the group. The computed quantity is the
1406 total projection:
1407 \begin{equation}
1408   \label{eq:cvc_eigenvector}
1409   { p(\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\},
1410     \{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}) } \; = \; {
1411     \sum_{i=1}^{n}  \mathbf{v}_{i} \cdot
1412     \left(U(\mathbf{x}_{i}(t) - \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)) -
1413       (\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}} -
1414       \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}) \right)\mathrm{,} }
1415 \end{equation}
1416 where, as in the \texttt{rmsd} component, $U$ is the optimal rotation
1417 matrix, $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)$ and
1418 $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}$ are the centers of
1419 geometry of the current and reference positions respectively, and
1420 $\mathbf{v}_{i}$ are the components of the vector for each atom.
1421 Example choices for $(\mathbf{v}_{i})$ are an eigenvector
1422 of the covariance matrix (essential mode), or a normal
1423 mode of the system.  It is assumed that $\sum_{i}\mathbf{v}_{i} = 0$:
1424 otherwise, the Colvars module centers the $\mathbf{v}_{i}$
1425 automatically when reading them from the configuration.
1426
1427 \begin{cvcoptions}
1428 \item %
1429   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{eigenvector}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1430 \item %
1431   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{eigenvector}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1432 \item %
1433   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{eigenvector}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1434 \cvnamebasedonly{
1435 \item %
1436   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{eigenvector}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1437 \item %
1438   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{eigenvector}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1439 }
1440
1441 \item %
1442   \key
1443     {vector}{%
1444     \texttt{eigenvector}}{%
1445     Vector components}{%
1446     space-separated list of \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplets}{%
1447     This option (mutually exclusive with \texttt{vectorFile}) sets the values of the vector components.}
1448
1449 \item %
1450   \key
1451     {vectorFile}{%
1452     \texttt{eigenvector}}{%
1453     file containing vector components}{%
1454     UNIX filename}{%
1455     This option (mutually exclusive with \texttt{vector}) sets the name of a coordinate file containing the vector components; the file is read according to the same format used for \texttt{refPositionsFile}.
1456     \cvnamebasedonly{For a PDB file specifically, the components are read from the X, Y and Z fields.
1457       \textbf{Note:} \emph{The PDB file has limited precision and fixed-point numbers: in some cases, the vector components may not be accurately represented; a XYZ file should be used instead, containing floating-point numbers.}}
1458   }
1459
1460 \cvnamebasedonly{
1461 \item %
1462   \key
1463     {vectorCol}{%
1464     \texttt{eigenvector}}{%
1465     PDB column used to flag participating atoms}{%
1466     \texttt{O} or \texttt{B}}{%
1467     Analogous to \texttt{atomsCol}.}
1468
1469 \item %
1470   \key
1471     {vectorColValue}{%
1472     \texttt{eigenvector}}{%
1473     Value used to flag participating atoms in the PDB file}{%
1474     positive decimal}{%
1475     Analogous to \texttt{atomsColValue}.}
1476 }
1477
1478 \item %
1479   \keydef
1480     {differenceVector}{%
1481     \texttt{eigenvector}}{%
1482     The $3n$-dimensional vector is the difference between \texttt{vector} and \texttt{refPositions}}{%
1483     boolean}{%
1484     \texttt{off}}{%
1485     If this option is \texttt{on}, the numbers provided by \texttt{vector}\cvnamebasedonly{ or \texttt{vectorFile}} are interpreted as another set of positions, $\mathbf{x}_{i}'$: the vector $\mathbf{v}_{i}$ is then defined as $\mathbf{v}_{i} = \left(\mathbf{x}_{i}' - \mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\right)$.
1486 This allows to conveniently define a colvar $\xi$ as a projection on the linear transformation between two sets of positions, ``A'' and ``B''.
1487 For convenience, the vector is also normalized so that $\xi = 0$ when the atoms are at the set of positions ``A'' and $\xi = 1$ at the set of positions ``B''.
1488 }
1489 \end{cvcoptions}
1490 This component returns a number (in \AA), whose value ranges between
1491 the smallest and largest absolute positions in the unit cell during
1492 the simulations (see also \texttt{distanceZ}).  Due to the
1493 normalization in eq.~\ref{eq:cvc_eigenvector}, this range does not
1494 depend on the number of atoms involved.
1495
1496
1497 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{gyration}: radius of gyration of a group  of atoms.}{sec:cvc_gyration}
1498 \labelkey{colvar|gyration}
1499
1500 The block \texttt{gyration~\{...\}} defines the
1501 parameters for calculating the radius of gyration of a group of atomic
1502 positions $\{ \mathbf{x}_1(t), \mathbf{x}_2(t), \ldots \mathbf{x}_N(t)
1503 \}$ with respect to their center of geometry,
1504 $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)$:
1505 \begin{equation}
1506   \label{eq:colvar_gyration}
1507   R_{\mathrm{gyr}} \; = \; \sqrt{ \frac{1}{N}
1508     \sum_{i=1}^{N} \left|\mathbf{x}_{i}(t) -
1509       \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)\right|^{2} }
1510 \end{equation}
1511 This component must contain one \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block to
1512 define the atom group, and returns a positive number, expressed in
1513 \AA{}.
1514
1515 \begin{cvcoptions}
1516 \item %
1517   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{gyration}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1518 \end{cvcoptions}
1519
1520
1521 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{inertia}: total moment of inertia of a group  of atoms.}{sec:cvc_inertia}
1522 \labelkey{colvar|inertia}
1523
1524 The block \texttt{inertia~\{...\}} defines the
1525 parameters for calculating the total moment of inertia of a group of atomic
1526 positions $\{ \mathbf{x}_1(t), \mathbf{x}_2(t), \ldots \mathbf{x}_N(t)
1527 \}$ with respect to their center of geometry,
1528 $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)$:
1529 \begin{equation}
1530   \label{eq:colvar_inertia}
1531   I \; = \; \sum_{i=1}^{N} \left|\mathbf{x}_{i}(t) -
1532       \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)\right|^{2}
1533 \end{equation}
1534 \emph{Note that all atomic masses are set to 1 for simplicity.}
1535 This component must contain one \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block to
1536 define the atom group, and returns a positive number, expressed in
1537 \AA{}$^{2}$.
1538
1539 \begin{cvcoptions}
1540 \item %
1541   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{inertia}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1542 \end{cvcoptions}
1543
1544
1545 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{dipoleMagnitude}: dipole magnitude of a group of atoms.}{sec:cvc_dipoleMagnitude}
1546 The \texttt{dipoleMagnitude~\{...\}} block defines the dipole magnitude of a group of atoms (norm of the dipole moment's vector), being \texttt{atoms} the group where dipole magnitude is calculated.
1547 It returns the magnitude in elementary charge $e$ times \cvnamdonly{\AA}\cvvmdonly{\AA}\cvlammpsonly{(length unit)}.
1548
1549 \begin{cvcoptions}
1550 \item %
1551   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{dipoleMagnitude}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1552 \end{cvcoptions}
1553
1554
1555 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{cartesian}: vector of atomic Cartesian coordinates.}{sec:cvc_cartesian}
1556 The \texttt{cartesian~\{...\}} block defines a component returning a flat vector containing
1557 the Cartesian coordinates of all participating atoms, in the order
1558 $(x_1, y_1, z_1, \cdots, x_n, y_n, z_n)$.
1559
1560
1561 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{inertiaZ}: total moment of inertia of a group of atoms around a chosen axis.}{sec:cvc_inertiaZ}
1562 \labelkey{colvar|inertiaZ}
1563
1564 The block \texttt{inertiaZ~\{...\}} defines the
1565 parameters for calculating the component along the axis $\mathbf{e}$ of the moment of inertia of a group of atomic
1566 positions $\{ \mathbf{x}_1(t), \mathbf{x}_2(t), \ldots \mathbf{x}_N(t)
1567 \}$ with respect to their center of geometry,
1568 $\mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)$:
1569 \begin{equation}
1570   \label{eq:colvar_inertia_z}
1571   I_{\mathbf{e}} \; = \; \sum_{i=1}^{N} \left(\left(\mathbf{x}_{i}(t) -
1572       \mathbf{x}_{\mathrm{cog}}(t)\right)\cdot\mathbf{e}\right)^{2}
1573 \end{equation}
1574 \emph{Note that all atomic masses are set to 1 for simplicity.}
1575 This component must contain one \texttt{atoms~\{...\}} block to
1576 define the atom group, and returns a positive number, expressed in
1577 \AA{}$^{2}$.
1578
1579
1580 \begin{cvcoptions}
1581 \item %
1582   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{inertiaZ}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1583 \item %
1584   \keydef
1585     {axis}{%
1586     \texttt{inertiaZ}}{%
1587     Projection axis (\AA{})}{%
1588     \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplet}{%
1589     \texttt{(0.0, 0.0, 1.0)}}{%
1590     The three components of this vector define (when normalized) the
1591     projection axis $\mathbf{e}$.}
1592 \end{cvcoptions}
1593
1594
1595 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{orientation}: orientation from reference coordinates.}{sec:cvc_orientation}
1596 \labelkey{colvar|orientation}
1597
1598 The block \texttt{orientation~\{...\}} returns the
1599 same optimal rotation used in the \texttt{rmsd} component to
1600 superimpose the coordinates $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\}$ onto a set of
1601 reference coordinates $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}$.  Such
1602 component returns a four dimensional vector $\mathsf{q} = (q_0, q_1,
1603 q_2, q_3)$, with $\sum_{i} q_{i}^{2} = 1$; this \emph{quaternion}
1604 expresses the optimal rotation $\{\mathbf{x}_{i}(t)\} \rightarrow
1605 \{\mathbf{x}_{i}^{\mathrm{(ref)}}\}$ according to the formalism in
1606 reference~\cite{Coutsias2004}.  The quaternion $(q_0, q_1, q_2, q_3)$
1607 can also be written as $\left(\cos(\theta/2), \,
1608   \sin(\theta/2)\mathbf{u}\right)$, where $\theta$ is the angle and
1609 $\mathbf{u}$ the normalized axis of rotation; for example, a rotation
1610 of 90$^{\circ}$ around the $z$ axis is expressed as
1611 ``\texttt{(0.707, 0.0, 0.0, 0.707)}''.  The script
1612 \texttt{quaternion2rmatrix.tcl} provides Tcl functions for converting
1613 to and from a $4\times{}4$ rotation matrix in a format suitable for
1614 usage in VMD.
1615
1616 As for the component \texttt{rmsd}, the available options are \texttt{atoms}, \texttt{refPositionsFile}\cvnamebasedonly{, \texttt{refPositionsCol} and \texttt{refPositionsColValue}, } and \texttt{refPositions}.
1617
1618 \textbf{Note:} \texttt{refPositions}and \texttt{refPositionsFile} define the set of positions \emph{from which} the optimal rotation is calculated, but this rotation is not applied to the coordinates of the atoms involved: it is used instead to define the variable itself.
1619
1620 \begin{cvcoptions}
1621 \item %
1622   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{orientation}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1623 \item %
1624   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{orientation}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1625 \item %
1626   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{orientation}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1627
1628 \cvnamebasedonly{
1629 \item %
1630   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{orientation}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1631 \item %
1632   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{orientation}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1633 }
1634
1635 \item %
1636   \keydef
1637     {closestToQuaternion}{%
1638     \texttt{orientation}}{%
1639     Reference rotation}{%
1640     ``\texttt{(q0, q1, q2, q3)}'' quadruplet}{%
1641     \texttt{(1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0)} (``null'' rotation)}{%
1642     Between the two equivalent quaternions $(q_0, q_1, q_2, q_3)$ and
1643     $(-q_0, -q_1, -q_2, -q_3)$, the closer to \texttt{(1.0, 0.0, 0.0,
1644       0.0)} is chosen.  This simplifies the visualization of the
1645     colvar trajectory when sampled values are a smaller subset of all
1646     possible rotations.  \textbf{Note:} \emph {this only affects the
1647       output, never the dynamics}.}
1648
1649 \end{cvcoptions}
1650
1651 \textbf{Tip: stopping the rotation of a protein.}  To stop the
1652 rotation of an elongated macromolecule in solution (and use an
1653 anisotropic box to save water molecules), it is possible to define a
1654 colvar with an \texttt{orientation} component, and restrain it throuh
1655 the \texttt{harmonic} bias around the identity rotation, \texttt{(1.0,
1656   0.0, 0.0, 0.0)}.  Only the overall orientation of the macromolecule
1657 is affected, and \emph{not} its internal degrees of freedom.  The user
1658 should also take care that the macromolecule is composed by a single
1659 chain, or disable \texttt{wrapAll} otherwise.
1660
1661
1662
1663 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{orientationAngle}: angle of rotation from reference coordinates.}{sec:cvc_orientationAngle}
1664 \labelkey{colvar|orientationAngle}
1665
1666 The block \texttt{orientationAngle~\{...\}} accepts the same base options as
1667 the component \texttt{orientation}: \texttt{atoms}, \texttt{refPositions}, \texttt{refPositionsFile}\cvnamebasedonly{, \texttt{refPositionsCol} and \texttt{refPositionsColValue}}.
1668 The returned value is the angle of rotation $\theta$ between the current and the reference positions.
1669 This angle is expressed in degrees within the range [0$^{\circ}$:180$^{\circ}$].
1670
1671 \begin{cvcoptions}
1672 \item %
1673   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{orientationAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1674 \item %
1675   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{orientationAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1676 \item %
1677   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{orientationAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1678
1679 \cvnamebasedonly{
1680 \item %
1681   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{orientationAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1682 \item %
1683   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{orientationAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1684 }
1685 \end{cvcoptions}
1686
1687
1688 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{orientationProj}: cosine of the angle of rotation from reference coordinates.}  {sec:cvc_orientationProj}
1689 \labelkey{colvar|orientationProj}
1690
1691 The block \texttt{orientationProj~\{...\}} accepts the same base options as
1692 the component \texttt{orientation}: \texttt{atoms}, \texttt{refPositions}, \texttt{refPositionsFile}\cvnamebasedonly{, \texttt{refPositionsCol} and \texttt{refPositionsColValue}}.
1693 The returned value is the cosine of the angle of rotation $\theta$ between the current and the reference positions.
1694 The range of values is [-1:1].
1695
1696 \begin{cvcoptions}
1697 \item %
1698   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{orientationProj}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1699 \item %
1700   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{orientationProj}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1701 \item %
1702   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{orientationProj}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1703 \cvnamebasedonly{
1704 \item %
1705   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{orientationProj}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1706 \item %
1707   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{orientationProj}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1708 }
1709 \end{cvcoptions}
1710
1711
1712 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{spinAngle}: angle of rotation around a given axis.}{sec:cvc_spinAngle}
1713 \labelkey{colvar|spinAngle}
1714
1715 The complete rotation described by \texttt{orientation} can optionally be decomposed into two sub-rotations: one is a ``\emph{spin}'' rotation around \textbf{e}, and the other a ``\emph{tilt}'' rotation around an axis orthogonal to \textbf{e}.
1716 The component \texttt{spinAngle} measures the angle of the ``spin'' sub-rotation around \textbf{e}.
1717
1718 \begin{cvcoptions}
1719 \item %
1720   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{spinAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1721 \item %
1722   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{spinAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1723 \item %
1724   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{spinAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1725 \cvnamebasedonly{
1726 \item %
1727   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{spinAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1728 \item %
1729   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{spinAngle}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1730 }
1731 \item %
1732   \labelkey{colvar|spinAngle|axis}
1733   \keydef
1734     {axis}{%
1735     \texttt{tilt}}{%
1736     Special rotation axis (\AA{})}{%
1737     \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplet}{%
1738     \texttt{(0.0, 0.0, 1.0)}}{%
1739     The three components of this vector define (when normalized) the special rotation axis used to calculate the \texttt{tilt} and \texttt{spinAngle} components.}
1740 \end{cvcoptions}
1741 The component \texttt{spinAngle} returns an angle (in degrees) within the periodic interval $[-180:180]$.  
1742
1743 \textbf{Note:} the value of \texttt{spinAngle} is a continuous function almost everywhere, with the exception of configurations with the corresponding ``tilt'' angle equal to 180$^\circ$ (i.e.~the \texttt{tilt} component is equal to $-1$): in those cases, \texttt{spinAngle} is undefined.  If such configurations are expected, consider defining a \texttt{tilt} colvar using the same axis \textbf{e}, and restraining it with a lower wall away from $-1$.
1744
1745
1746 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{tilt}: cosine of the rotation orthogonal to a given axis.}{sec:cvc_tilt}
1747 \labelkey{colvar|tilt}
1748
1749 The component \texttt{tilt} measures the cosine of the angle of the ``tilt'' sub-rotation, which combined with the ``spin'' sub-rotation provides the complete rotation of a group of atoms.
1750 The cosine of the tilt angle rather than the tilt angle itself is implemented, because the latter is unevenly distributed even for an isotropic system: consider as an analogy the angle $\theta$ in the spherical coordinate system.
1751 The component \texttt{tilt} relies on the same options as \texttt{spinAngle}, including the definition of the axis \textbf{e}.
1752 The values of \texttt{tilt} are real numbers in the interval $[-1:1]$: the value $1$ represents an orientation fully parallel to \textbf{e} (tilt angle = 0$^\circ$), and the value $-1$ represents an anti-parallel orientation.
1753
1754 \begin{cvcoptions}
1755 \item %
1756   \dupkey{atoms}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|rmsd|atoms}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1757 \item %
1758   \dupkey{refPositions}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositions}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1759 \item %
1760   \dupkey{refPositionsFile}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsFile}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1761 \cvnamebasedonly{
1762 \item %
1763   \dupkey{refPositionsCol}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsCol}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1764 \item %
1765   \dupkey{refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|rmsd|refPositionsColValue}{\texttt{rmsd} component}
1766 }
1767 \item %
1768   \dupkey{axis}{\texttt{tilt}}{colvar|spinAngle|axis}{\texttt{spinAngle} component}
1769 \end{cvcoptions}
1770  
1771
1772 \cvnamebasedonly{
1773
1774 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{alpha}: $\alpha$-helix content of a protein segment.}{sec:cvc_alpha}
1775 \labelkey{colvar|alpha}
1776
1777 The block \texttt{alpha~\{...\}} defines the
1778 parameters to calculate the helical content of a segment of protein
1779 residues.  The $\alpha$-helical content across the $N+1$ residues
1780 $N_{0}$ to $N_{0}+N$ is calculated by the formula:
1781 \begin{eqnarray}
1782   \label{eq:colvars_alpha}
1783   { 
1784     \alpha\left(
1785       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(N_{0})},
1786       \mathrm{O}^{(N_{0})},
1787       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(N_{0}+1)},
1788       \mathrm{O}^{(N_{0}+1)},
1789       \ldots
1790       \mathrm{N}^{(N_{0}+5)},
1791       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(N_{0}+5)},
1792       \mathrm{O}^{(N_{0}+5)},
1793       \ldots
1794       \mathrm{N}^{(N_{0}+N)},
1795       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(N_{0}+N)}
1796     \right)
1797   } \; = \; \; \; \; \\ \; \; \; \; {
1798     \nonumber
1799     \frac{1}{2(N-2)} 
1800     \sum_{n=N_{0}}^{N_{0}+N-2}
1801     \mathrm{angf}\left(
1802         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n)},
1803         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+1)},
1804         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+2)}\right)
1805   } \; + \; {
1806     \frac{1}{2(N-4)} 
1807     \sum_{n=N_{0}}^{N_{0}+N-4}
1808     \mathrm{hbf}\left(
1809       \mathrm{O}^{(n)},
1810       \mathrm{N}^{(n+4)}\right) \mathrm{,}
1811   } \\
1812 \end{eqnarray}
1813 where the score function for the $\mathrm{C}_{\alpha} -
1814 \mathrm{C}_{\alpha} - \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}$ angle is defined as: 
1815 \begin{equation}
1816   \label{eq:colvars_alpha_Calpha}
1817   {
1818     \mathrm{angf}\left(
1819       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n)},
1820       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+1)},
1821       \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+2)}\right)
1822   } \; = \; {
1823     \frac{1 - \left(\theta(
1824         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n)},
1825         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+1)},
1826         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+2)}) -
1827         \theta_{0}\right)^{2} /
1828       \left(\Delta\theta_{\mathrm{tol}}\right)^{2}}{
1829       1 - \left(\theta(
1830         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n)},
1831         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+1)},
1832         \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}^{(n+2)}) -
1833         \theta_{0}\right)^{4} /
1834       \left(\Delta\theta_{\mathrm{tol}}\right)^{4}} \mathrm{,}
1835   }
1836 \end{equation}
1837 and the score function for the $\mathrm{O}^{(n)} \leftrightarrow
1838 \mathrm{N}^{(n+4)}$ hydrogen bond is defined through a \texttt{hBond}
1839 colvar component on the same atoms.
1840
1841 \begin{cvcoptions}
1842
1843 \item %
1844   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|residueRange}
1845   \key
1846     {residueRange}{%
1847       \texttt{alpha}}{%
1848       Potential $\alpha$-helical residues}{%
1849     ``$<$Initial residue number$>$-$<$Final residue number$>$''}{%
1850     This option specifies the range of residues on which this
1851     component should be defined.  The Colvars module looks for the
1852     atoms within these residues named ``\texttt{CA}'', ``\texttt{N}''
1853     and ``\texttt{O}'', and raises an error if any of those atoms is
1854     not found.}
1855
1856 \item %
1857   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|psfSegID}
1858   \key
1859     {psfSegID}{%
1860     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1861     PSF segment identifier}{%
1862     string (max 4 characters)}{%
1863     This option sets the PSF segment identifier for the residues
1864     specified in \texttt{residueRange}.  This option is only required
1865     when PSF topologies are used.}
1866
1867
1868 \item %
1869   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|hBondCoeff}
1870   \keydef
1871     {hBondCoeff}{%
1872     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1873     Coefficient for the hydrogen bond term}{%
1874     positive between 0 and 1}{%
1875     0.5}{%
1876     This number specifies the contribution to the total value from the
1877     hydrogen bond terms.  0 disables the hydrogen bond terms, 1
1878     disables the angle terms.}
1879
1880 \item %
1881   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|angleRef}
1882   \keydef
1883     {angleRef}{%
1884     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1885     Reference $\mathrm{C}_{\alpha} -
1886     \mathrm{C}_{\alpha} - \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}$ angle}{%
1887     positive decimal}{%
1888     88$^{\circ}$}{%
1889     This option sets the reference angle used in the score function
1890     (\ref{eq:colvars_alpha_Calpha}).}
1891
1892 \item %
1893   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|angleTol}
1894   \keydef
1895     {angleTol}{%
1896     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1897     Tolerance in the $\mathrm{C}_{\alpha} -
1898     \mathrm{C}_{\alpha} - \mathrm{C}_{\alpha}$ angle}{%
1899     positive decimal}{%
1900     15$^{\circ}$}{%
1901     This option sets the angle tolerance used in the score function
1902     (\ref{eq:colvars_alpha_Calpha}).}
1903
1904 \item %
1905   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|hBondCutoff}
1906   \keydef
1907     {hBondCutoff}{%
1908     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1909     Hydrogen bond cutoff}{%
1910     positive decimal}{%
1911     3.3~\AA{}}{%
1912     Equivalent to the \texttt{cutoff} option in the \texttt{hBond}
1913     component.}
1914
1915 \item %
1916   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|hBondExpNumer}
1917   \keydef
1918     {hBondExpNumer}{%
1919     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1920     Hydrogen bond numerator exponent}{%
1921     positive integer}{%
1922     6}{%
1923     Equivalent to the \texttt{expNumer} option in the \texttt{hBond}
1924     component.}
1925
1926 \item %
1927   \labelkey{colvar|alpha|hBondExpDenom}
1928   \keydef
1929     {hBondExpDenom}{%
1930     \texttt{alpha}}{%
1931     Hydrogen bond denominator exponent}{%
1932     positive integer}{%
1933     8}{%
1934     Equivalent to the \texttt{expDenom} option in the \texttt{hBond}
1935     component.}
1936
1937 \end{cvcoptions}
1938
1939 This component returns positive values, always comprised between 0
1940 (lowest $\alpha$-helical score) and 1 (highest $\alpha$-helical
1941 score).
1942
1943
1944 \cvsubsubsec{\texttt{dihedralPC}: protein dihedral pricipal component}{sec:cvc_dihedralPC}
1945 \labelkey{colvar|dihedralPC}
1946
1947 The block \texttt{dihedralPC~\{...\}} defines the
1948 parameters to calculate the projection of backbone dihedral angles within
1949 a protein segment onto a \emph{dihedral principal component}, following
1950 the formalism of dihedral principal component analysis (dPCA) proposed by
1951 Mu et al.\cite{Mu2005} and documented in detail by Altis et
1952 al.\cite{Altis2007}.
1953 Given a peptide or protein segment of $N$ residues, each with Ramachandran
1954 angles $\phi_i$ and $\psi_i$, dPCA rests on a variance/covariance analysis
1955 of the $4(N-1)$ variables $\cos(\psi_1), \sin(\psi_1), \cos(\phi_2), \sin(\phi_2)
1956 \cdots \cos(\phi_N), \sin(\phi_N)$. Note that angles $\phi_1$ and $\psi_N$
1957 have little impact on chain conformation, and are therefore discarded,
1958 following the implementation of dPCA in the analysis software Carma.\cite{Glykos2006}
1959
1960 For a given principal component (eigenvector) of coefficients
1961 $(k_i)_{1 \leq i \leq 4(N-1)}$,
1962 the projection of the current backbone conformation is:
1963 \begin{equation}
1964 \xi = \sum_{n=1}^{N-1} k_{4n-3} \cos(\psi_n) + k_{4n-2} \sin (\psi_n)
1965 + k_{4n-1} \cos (\phi_{n+1}) + k_{4n} \sin(\phi_{n+1})
1966 \end{equation}
1967
1968 \texttt{dihedralPC} expects the same parameters as the \texttt{alpha}
1969 component for defining the relevant residues (\texttt{residueRange}
1970 and \texttt{psfSegID}) in addition to the following:
1971
1972 \begin{cvcoptions}
1973
1974 \item %
1975   \dupkey{residueRange}{\texttt{dihedralPC}}{colvar|alpha|residueRange}{\texttt{alpha} component}
1976
1977 \item %
1978   \dupkey{psfSegID}{\texttt{dihedralPC}}{colvar|alpha|psfSegID}{\texttt{alpha} component}
1979
1980 \item %
1981   \key
1982     {vectorFile}{%
1983     \texttt{dihedralPC}}{%
1984     File containing dihedral PCA eigenvector(s)}{%
1985     file name}{%
1986     A text file containing the coefficients of dihedral PCA eigenvectors on the
1987     cosine and sine coordinates. The vectors should be arranged in columns,
1988     as in the files output by Carma.\cite{Glykos2006}}
1989
1990 \item %
1991   \key
1992     {vectorNumber}{%
1993     \texttt{dihedralPC}}{%
1994     File containing dihedralPCA eigenvector(s)}{%
1995     positive integer}{%
1996     Number of the eigenvector to be used for this component.}
1997 \end{cvcoptions}
1998
1999 } % end of \cvnamebasedonly
2000
2001
2002 \cvsubsec{Shared keywords for all components}{sec:cvc_common}
2003
2004 The following options can be used for any of the above colvar components in order to obtain a polynomial combination\cvscriptonly{ or any user-supplied function provided by \refkey{scriptedFunction}{sec:cvc_superp}}.
2005 \begin{itemize}
2006 \item %
2007   \keydef
2008     {name}{%
2009     any component}{%
2010     Name of this component}{%
2011     string}{%
2012     type of component + numeric id}{%
2013     The name is an unique case-sensitive string which allows the
2014     Colvars module to identify this component. This is useful, for example,
2015     when combining multiple components via a \texttt{scriptedFunction}.
2016     \cvnamdonly{It also defines the variable name representing the component's value in a \refkey{customFunction}{colvar|customFunction} expression.}}
2017
2018 \item %
2019   \keydef
2020     {scalable}{%
2021     any component}{%
2022     Attempt to calculate this component in parallel?}{%
2023     boolean}{%
2024     \texttt{on}, if available}{%
2025     If set to \texttt{on} (default), the Colvars module will attempt to calculate this component in parallel to reduce overhead.
2026     Whether this option is available depends on the type of component: currently supported are \texttt{distance}, \texttt{distanceZ}, \texttt{distanceXY}, \texttt{distanceVec}, \texttt{distanceDir}, \texttt{angle} and \texttt{dihedral}.
2027     This flag influences computational cost, but does not affect numerical results: therefore, it should only be turned off for debugging or testing purposes.
2028   }
2029 \end{itemize}
2030
2031
2032 \cvsubsec{Periodic components}{sec:cvc_periodic}
2033 The following components returns
2034 real numbers that lie in a periodic interval:
2035 \begin{itemize}
2036 \item \texttt{dihedral}: torsional angle between four groups;
2037 \item \texttt{spinAngle}: angle of rotation around a predefined axis
2038   in the best-fit from a set of reference coordinates.
2039 \end{itemize}
2040 In certain conditions, \texttt{distanceZ} can also be periodic, namely
2041 when periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) are defined in the simulation
2042 and \texttt{distanceZ}'s axis is parallel to a unit cell vector.
2043
2044 In addition, a custom \cvscriptonly{or scripted} scalar colvar may be periodic
2045 depending on its user-defined expression. It will only be treated as such by
2046 the Colvars module if the period is specified using the \texttt{period} keyword,
2047 while \texttt{wrapAround} is optional.
2048
2049 The following keywords can be used within periodic components\cvleptononly{, or within custom variables (\ref{sec:colvar_custom_function})}\cvscriptonly{, or wthin scripted variables \ref{sec:colvar_scripted}}).
2050
2051 \begin{itemize}
2052 \item %
2053   \keydef
2054     {period}{%
2055     \texttt{distanceZ}, custom colvars}{%
2056     Period of the component}{%
2057     positive decimal}{%
2058     0.0}{%
2059     Setting this number enables the treatment of \texttt{distanceZ} as
2060     a periodic component: by default, \texttt{distanceZ} is not
2061     considered periodic.  The keyword is supported, but irrelevant
2062     within \texttt{dihedral} or \texttt{spinAngle}, because their
2063     period is always 360~degrees.}
2064
2065 \item %
2066   \keydef
2067     {wrapAround}{%
2068     \texttt{distanceZ}, \texttt{dihedral}, \texttt{spinAngle}, custom colvars}{%
2069     Center of the wrapping interval for periodic variables}{%
2070     decimal}{%
2071     0.0}{%
2072     By default, values of the periodic components are centered around zero, ranging from $-P/2$ to $P/2$, where $P$ is the period.
2073     Setting this number centers the interval around this value.
2074     This can be useful for convenience of output, or to set the walls for a \texttt{harmonicWalls} in an order that would not otherwise be allowed.}
2075 \end{itemize}
2076
2077 Internally, all differences between two values of a periodic colvar
2078 follow the minimum image convention: they are calculated based on
2079 the two periodic images that are closest to each other.
2080
2081 \emph{Note: linear or polynomial combinations of periodic components (see \ref{sec:cvc_superp}) may become meaningless when components cross the periodic boundary.  Use such combinations carefully: estimate the range of possible values of each component in a given simulation, and make use of \texttt{wrapAround} to limit this problem whenever possible.}
2082
2083
2084 \cvsubsec{Non-scalar components}{sec:cvc_non_scalar}
2085
2086 When one of the following components are used, the defined colvar returns a value that is not a scalar number:
2087 \begin{itemize}
2088 \item \texttt{distanceVec}: 3-dimensional vector of the distance
2089   between two groups;
2090 \item \texttt{distanceDir}: 3-dimensional unit vector of the distance
2091   between two groups;
2092 \item \texttt{orientation}: 4-dimensional unit quaternion representing
2093   the best-fit rotation from a set of reference coordinates.
2094 \end{itemize}
2095 The distance between two 3-dimensional unit vectors is computed as the
2096 angle between them.  The distance between two quaternions is computed
2097 as the angle between the two 4-dimensional unit vectors: because the
2098 orientation represented by $\mathsf{q}$ is the same as the one
2099 represented by $-\mathsf{q}$, distances between two quaternions are
2100 computed considering the closest of the two symmetric images.
2101
2102 Non-scalar components carry the following restrictions:
2103 \begin{itemize}
2104 \item Calculation of total forces (\texttt{outputTotalForce} option)
2105   is currently not implemented.
2106 \item Each colvar can only contain one non-scalar component.
2107 \item Binning on a grid (\texttt{abf}, \texttt{histogram} and
2108   \texttt{metadynamics} with \texttt{useGrids} enabled) is currently
2109   not implemented for colvars based on such components.
2110 \end{itemize}
2111
2112 \emph{Note: while these restrictions apply to individual colvars based
2113   on non-scalar components, no limit is set to the number of scalar
2114   colvars.  To compute multi-dimensional histograms and PMFs, use sets
2115   of scalar colvars of arbitrary size.}
2116
2117
2118 \cvsubsubsec{Calculating total forces}{sec:cvc_sys_forces}
2119 In addition to the restrictions due to the type of value computed (scalar or non-scalar),
2120 a final restriction can arise when calculating total force
2121 (\texttt{outputTotalForce} option or application of a \texttt{abf}
2122 bias).  total forces are available currently only for the following
2123 components: \texttt{distance}, \texttt{distanceZ},
2124 \texttt{distanceXY}, \texttt{angle}, \texttt{dihedral}, \texttt{rmsd},
2125 \texttt{eigenvector} and \texttt{gyration}.
2126
2127
2128
2129 \cvsubsec{Linear and polynomial combinations of components}{sec:cvc_superp}
2130
2131 To extend the set of possible definitions of colvars $\xi(\mathbf{r})$, multiple components
2132 $q_i(\mathbf{r})$ can be summed with the formula:
2133 \begin{equation}
2134   \label{eq:colvar_combination}
2135   \xi(\mathbf{r}) = \sum_i c_i [q_i(\mathbf{r})]^{n_i}
2136 \end{equation}
2137 where each component appears with a unique coefficient $c_i$ (1.0 by
2138 default) the positive integer exponent $n_i$ (1 by default).
2139
2140 Any set of components can be combined within a colvar, provided that
2141 they return the same type of values (scalar, unit vector, vector, or
2142 quaternion).  By default, the colvar is the sum of its components.
2143 Linear or polynomial combinations (following
2144 equation~(\ref{eq:colvar_combination})) can be obtained by setting the
2145 following parameters, which are common to all components:
2146 \begin{itemize}
2147 \item %
2148   \keydef
2149     {componentCoeff}{%
2150     any component}{%
2151     Coefficient of this component in the colvar}{%
2152     decimal}{%
2153     \texttt{1.0}}{%
2154     Defines the coefficient by which this component is multiplied
2155     (after being raised to \texttt{componentExp}) before being added
2156     to the sum.}
2157
2158 \item %
2159   \keydef
2160     {componentExp}{%
2161     any component}{%
2162     Exponent of this component in the colvar}{%
2163     integer}{%
2164     \texttt{1}}{%
2165     Defines the power at which the value of this component is raised
2166     before being added to the sum.  When this exponent is
2167     different than 1 (non-linear sum), total forces and the Jacobian
2168     force are not available, making the colvar unsuitable for ABF calculations.}
2169 \end{itemize}
2170
2171 \textbf{Example:} To define the \emph{average} of a colvar across
2172 different parts of the system, simply define within the same colvar
2173 block a series of components of the same type (applied to different
2174 atom groups), and assign to each component a \texttt{componentCoeff}
2175 of $1/N$.
2176
2177
2178 \cvleptononly{
2179 \cvsubsec{Custom functions}{sec:colvar_custom_function}
2180
2181 Collective variables may be defined by specifying a custom function as an analytical
2182 expression such as \texttt{cos(x) + y\^{}2}.
2183 The expression is parsed by the Lepton expression parser (written by Peter Eastman),
2184 which produces efficient evaluation routines for the function itself as well as its derivatives.
2185 The expression may use the collective variable components as variables, refered to as their \texttt{name} string.
2186 Scalar elements of vector components may be accessed by appending a 1-based index to their \texttt{name}.
2187 When implementing generic functions of Cartesian coordinates rather
2188 than functions of existing components, the \texttt{cartesian} component
2189 may be particularly useful.
2190 A scalar-valued custom variable may be manually defined as periodic by providing
2191 the keyword \texttt{period}, and the optional keyword \texttt{wrapAround}, with the
2192 same meaning as in periodic components (see \ref{sec:cvc_periodic} for details).
2193 A vector variable may be defined by specifying the \texttt{customFunction} parameter several times: each expression defines one scalar element of the vector colvar.
2194 This is illustrated in the example below.
2195
2196 \bigskip
2197 {%
2198 % verbatim can't appear within commands
2199 \noindent\ttfamily colvar \{\\
2200 \-~~name custom\\
2201 \\
2202 \-~~\# A 2-dimensional vector function of a scalar x and a 3-vector r\\
2203 \-~~customFunction cos(x) * (r1 + r2 + r3)\\
2204 \-~~customFunction sqrt(r1 * r2)\\
2205 \\
2206 \-~~distance \{\\
2207 \-~~~~name x\\
2208 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbers 1 \}\\
2209 \-~~~~group2 \{ atomNumbers 50 \}\\
2210 \-~~\}\\
2211 \-~~distanceVec \{\\
2212 \-~~~~name r\\
2213 \-~~~~group1 \{ atomNumbers 10 11 12 \}\\
2214 \-~~~~group2 \{ atomNumbers  20 21 22 \}\\
2215 \-~~\}\\
2216 \}}
2217
2218 \begin{itemize}
2219 \item %
2220    \labelkey{colvar|customFunction}
2221    \key 
2222     {customFunction}{%
2223     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2224     Compute colvar as a custom function of its components}{%
2225     string}{%
2226     Defines the colvar as a scalar expression of its colvar components. Multiple mentions can
2227     be used to define a vector variable  (as in the example above).}
2228
2229 \item %
2230   \keydef
2231     {customFunctionType}{%
2232     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2233     Type of value returned by the scripted colvar}{%
2234     string}{%
2235     \texttt{scalar}}{%
2236     With this flag, the user may specify whether the
2237     colvar is a scalar or one of the following vector types: \texttt{vector3}
2238     (a 3D vector), \texttt{unit\_vector3} (a normalized 3D vector), or
2239     \texttt{unit\_quaternion} (a normalized quaternion), or \texttt{vector}.
2240     Note that the scalar and vector cases are not necessary, as they are detected automatically.}
2241 \end{itemize}
2242 }
2243
2244
2245 \cvscriptonly{
2246 \cvsubsec{Scripted functions}{sec:colvar_scripted}
2247 When scripting is supported\cvnamdonly{ (default in NAMD)}\cvvmdonly{ (default in VMD)},
2248 a colvar may be defined as a scripted function of its components,
2249 rather than a linear or polynomial combination.
2250 When implementing generic functions of Cartesian coordinates rather
2251 than functions of existing components, the \texttt{cartesian} component
2252 may be particularly useful.
2253 A scalar-valued scripted variable may be manually defined as periodic by providing
2254 the keyword \texttt{period}, and the optional keyword \texttt{wrapAround}, with the
2255 same meaning as in periodic components (see \ref{sec:cvc_periodic} for details).
2256
2257 An example of elaborate scripted colvar is given in example 10, in the
2258 form of path-based collective variables as defined by Branduardi et al\cite{Branduardi2007}
2259 (\ref{sec:pathcv}).
2260
2261 \begin{itemize}
2262  \item %
2263    \labelkey{colvar|scriptedFunction}
2264    \key 
2265     {scriptedFunction}{%
2266     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2267     Compute colvar as a scripted function of its components}{%
2268     string}{%
2269     If this option is specified, the colvar will be computed as a
2270     scripted function of the values of its components.
2271     To that effect, the user should define two Tcl procedures:
2272     \texttt{calc\_$<$scriptedFunction$>$} and \texttt{calc\_$<$scriptedFunction$>$\_gradient},
2273     both accepting as many parameters as the colvar has components.
2274     Values of the components will be passed to those procedures in the
2275     order defined by their sorted \texttt{name} strings. Note that if all
2276     components are of the same type, their default names are sorted in the
2277     order in which they are defined, so that names need only be specified
2278     for combinations of components of different types.
2279     \texttt{calc\_$<$scriptedFunction$>$} should return one value of 
2280     type $<$scriptedFunctionType$>$, corresponding to the colvar value.
2281     \texttt{calc\_$<$scriptedFunction$>$\_gradient} should return a Tcl list
2282     containing the derivatives of the function with respect to each
2283     component. 
2284     If both the function and some of the components are vectors, the gradient
2285     is really a Jacobian matrix that should be passed as a linear vector in
2286     row-major order, i.e. for a function $f_i(x_j)$: $\nabla_x f_1 \nabla_x f_2 \cdots$.
2287   }
2288
2289 \item%
2290   \keydef
2291     {scriptedFunctionType}{%
2292     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2293     Type of value returned by the scripted colvar}{%
2294     string}{%
2295     \texttt{scalar}}{%
2296     If a colvar is defined as a scripted function, its type is not constrained by
2297     the types of its components. With this flag, the user may specify whether the
2298     colvar is a scalar or one of the following vector types: \texttt{vector3}
2299     (a 3D vector), \texttt{unit\_vector3} (a normalized 3D vector), or
2300     \texttt{unit\_quaternion} (a normalized quaternion), or \texttt{vector}
2301     (a vector whose size is specified by \texttt{scriptedFunctionVectorSize}).
2302     Non-scalar values should be passed as space-separated lists.}
2303
2304  \item %
2305   \key
2306     {scriptedFunctionVectorSize}{%
2307     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2308     Dimension of the vector value of a scripted colvar}{%
2309     positive integer}{%
2310     This parameter is only valid when \texttt{scriptedFunctionType} is
2311     set to \texttt{vector}. It defines the vector length of the colvar value
2312     returned by the function.}
2313 \end{itemize}
2314 } % \cvscriptonly
2315
2316
2317
2318 \cvsubsec{Defining grid parameters}{sec:colvar_grid_params}
2319
2320 Many algorithms require the definition of boundaries and/or characteristic spacings that can be used to define discrete ``states'' in the collective variable, or to combine variables with very different units.
2321 The parameters described below offer a way to specify these parameters only once for each variable, while using them multiple times in restraints, time-dependent biases or analysis methods.
2322
2323 \begin{itemize}
2324
2325 \item %
2326   \labelkey{colvar|width}
2327   \keydef
2328     {width}{%
2329     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2330     Unit of the variable, or grid spacing}{%
2331     positive decimal}{%
2332     1.0}{%
2333     This number defines the effective unit of measurement for the collective variable, and is used by the biasing methods for the following purposes.
2334     Harmonic (\ref{sec:colvarbias_harmonic}), harmonic walls (\ref{sec:colvarbias_harmonic_walls}) and linear restraints (\ref{sec:colvarbias_linear}) use it to set the physical unit of the force constant, which is useful for multidimensional restraints involving multiple variables with very different units (for examples, $\AA$ or degrees $^\circ$) with a single, scaled force constant.
2335     The values of the scaled force constant in the units of each variable are printed at initialization time. 
2336     Histograms (\ref{sec:colvarbias_histogram}), ABF (\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf}) and metadynamics (\ref{sec:colvarbias_meta}) all use this number as the initial choice for the grid spacing along this variable: for this reason, \texttt{width} should generally be no larger than the standard deviation of the colvar in an unbiased simulation.
2337     Unless it is required to control the spacing, it is usually simplest to keep the default value of 1, so that restraint force constants are provided with their full physical unit.
2338   }
2339
2340 \item %
2341   \labelkey{colvar|lowerBoundary}
2342   \key
2343     {lowerBoundary}{%
2344     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2345     Lower boundary of the colvar}{%
2346     decimal}{%
2347     Defines the lowest end of the interval of ``relevant'' values for the colvar.
2348     This number can be either a true physical boundary, or a user-defined number.  
2349     Together with \texttt{upperBoundary} and \texttt{width}, it is used to define a grid of values along the variable (not available for variables with vector values, \ref{sec:cvc_non_scalar}).
2350     \emph{This option does not affect dynamics: to confine a colvar within a certain interval, use a \texttt{harmonicWalls} bias.}
2351 }
2352
2353 \item %
2354   \labelkey{colvar|upperBoundary} %
2355   \key
2356     {upperBoundary}{%
2357     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2358     Upper boundary of the colvar}{%
2359     decimal}{%
2360     Similarly to \texttt{lowerBoundary}, defines the highest possible or allowed value.}
2361
2362 \item %
2363   \keydef
2364     {hardLowerBoundary}{%
2365     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2366     Whether the lower boundary is the physical lower limit}{%
2367     boolean}{%
2368     \texttt{off}}{%
2369     This option does not affect simulation results, but enables some internal optimizations.
2370     Depending on its mathematical definition, a colvar may have ``natural'' boundaries: for example, a \texttt{distance} colvar has a ``natural'' lower boundary at 0.  Setting this option instructs the Colvars module that the user-defined lower boundary is ``natural''.
2371 See Section~\ref{sec:cvc_list} for the physical ranges of values of each component.}
2372
2373 \item %
2374   \keydef
2375     {hardUpperBoundary}{%
2376     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2377     Whether the upper boundary is the physical upper limit of the colvar's values}{%
2378     boolean}{%
2379     \texttt{off}}{%
2380     Analogous to \texttt{hardLowerBoundary}.}
2381
2382 \item %
2383   \labelkey{colvar|expandBoundaries} %
2384   \keydef
2385     {expandBoundaries}{%
2386     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2387     Allow to expand the two boundaries if needed}{%
2388     boolean}{%
2389     \texttt{off}}{%
2390     If defined, biasing and analysis methods may keep their own copies
2391     of \texttt{lowerBoundary} and \texttt{upperBoundary}, and expand
2392     them to accommodate values that do not fit in the initial range.
2393     Currently, this option is used by the metadynamics bias
2394     (\ref{sec:colvarbias_meta}) to keep all of its hills fully within
2395     the grid.  This option cannot be used when
2396       the initial boundaries already span the full period of a periodic
2397       colvar.}
2398
2399 \end{itemize}
2400
2401
2402
2403 \cvsubsec{Trajectory output}{sec:colvar_traj_output}
2404
2405 \begin{itemize}
2406 \item %
2407   \keydef
2408     {outputValue}{%
2409     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2410     Output a trajectory for this colvar}{%
2411     boolean}{%
2412     \texttt{on}}{%
2413     If \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is non-zero, the value of this
2414     colvar is written to the trajectory file every
2415     \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} steps in the column labeled
2416     ``$<$\texttt{name}$>$''.}
2417
2418 \item %
2419   \keydef
2420     {outputVelocity}{%
2421     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2422     Output a velocity trajectory for this colvar}{%
2423     boolean}{%
2424     \texttt{off}}{%
2425     If \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is defined, the
2426     finite-difference calculated velocity of this colvar are written
2427     to the trajectory file under the label
2428     ``\texttt{v\_}$<$\texttt{name}$>$''.}
2429
2430 \item %
2431   \keydef
2432     {outputEnergy}{%
2433     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2434     Output an energy trajectory for this colvar}{%
2435     boolean}{%
2436     \texttt{off}}{%
2437     This option applies only to extended Lagrangian colvars. If
2438     \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is defined, the kinetic energy of
2439     the extended degree and freedom and the potential energy of the
2440     restraining spring are are written to the trajectory file under
2441     the labels ``\texttt{Ek\_}$<$\texttt{name}$>$'' and
2442     ``\texttt{Ep\_}$<$\texttt{name}$>$''.}
2443
2444 \item %
2445   \labelkey{colvar|outputTotalForce}
2446   \keydef
2447     {outputTotalForce}{%
2448     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2449     Output a total force trajectory for this
2450     colvar}{%
2451     boolean}{%
2452     \texttt{off}}{%
2453     If \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is defined, the total force on this
2454     colvar (i.e.~the projection of all atomic total forces
2455     onto this colvar --- see
2456     equation~(\ref{eq:gradient_vector}) in
2457     section~\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf}) are written to the trajectory
2458     file under the label ``\texttt{fs\_}$<$\texttt{name}$>$''.
2459     For extended Lagrangian colvars, the ``total force'' felt by the extended degree of freedom
2460     is simply the force from the harmonic spring.
2461     \textbf{Note:} not all components support this option.  The
2462     physical unit for this force is \cvnamdonly{kcal/mol}\cvvmdonly{kcal/mol}\cvlammpsonly{the unit of energy specified by \texttt{units}}, divided by the colvar unit U.}
2463
2464 \item %
2465   \keydef
2466     {outputAppliedForce}{%
2467     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2468     Output an applied force trajectory for this
2469     colvar}{%
2470     boolean}{%
2471     \texttt{off}}{%
2472     If \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is defined, the total force
2473     applied on this colvar by Colvars biases are
2474     written to the trajectory under the label
2475     ``\texttt{fa\_}$<$\texttt{name}$>$''. 
2476     For extended Lagrangian colvars, this force is actually applied to the
2477     extended degree of freedom rather than the geometric colvar itself.
2478     The physical unit for this
2479     force is \cvnamdonly{kcal/mol}\cvvmdonly{kcal/mol}\cvlammpsonly{the unit of energy specified by \texttt{units}} divided by the colvar unit.}
2480
2481 \end{itemize}
2482
2483
2484 \cvsubsec{Extended Lagrangian}{sec:colvar_extended}
2485
2486 The following options enable extended-system
2487 dynamics, where a colvar is coupled to an additional degree of freedom 
2488 (fictitious particle) by a harmonic spring.
2489 All biasing and confining forces are then applied to the extended degree
2490 of freedom. The ``actual'' geometric colvar (function of Cartesian 
2491 coordinates) only feels the force from the harmonic spring.
2492 This is particularly useful when combined with an ABF bias (\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf})
2493 to perform eABF simulations (\ref{sec:eABF}).
2494
2495 \begin{itemize}
2496 \item %
2497   \keydef
2498     {extendedLagrangian}{%
2499     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2500     Add extended degree of freedom}{%
2501     boolean}{%
2502     \texttt{off}}{%
2503     Adds a fictitious particle to be coupled to the colvar by a harmonic
2504     spring. The fictitious mass and the force constant of the coupling
2505     potential are derived from the parameters \texttt{extendedTimeConstant}
2506     and \texttt{extendedFluctuation}, described below. Biasing forces on the
2507     colvar are applied to this fictitious particle, rather than to the
2508     atoms directly.  This implements the extended Lagrangian formalism
2509     used in some metadynamics simulations~\cite{Iannuzzi2003}.
2510     \cvnamdonly{The energy associated with the extended degree of freedom is reported
2511     under the MISC title in NAMD's energy output.}
2512     }
2513
2514 \item %
2515   \key
2516     {extendedFluctuation}{%
2517     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2518     Standard deviation between the colvar and the fictitious
2519     particle (colvar unit)}{%
2520     positive decimal}{%
2521     Defines the spring stiffness for the \texttt{extendedLagrangian}
2522     mode, by setting the typical deviation between the colvar and the extended
2523     degree of freedom due to thermal fluctuation.
2524     The spring force constant is calculated internally as $k_B T / \sigma^2$,
2525     where $\sigma$ is the value of \texttt{extendedFluctuation}.}
2526
2527 \item %
2528   \keydef
2529     {extendedTimeConstant}{%
2530     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2531     Oscillation period of the fictitious particle (fs)}{%
2532     positive decimal}{%
2533     \texttt{200}}{%
2534     Defines the inertial mass of the fictitious particle, by setting the
2535     oscillation period of the harmonic oscillator formed by the fictitious
2536     particle and the spring. The period
2537     should be much larger than the MD time step to ensure accurate integration
2538     of the extended particle's equation of motion.
2539     The fictitious mass is calculated internally as $k_B T (\tau/2 \pi \sigma)^2$,
2540     where $\tau$ is the period and $\sigma$ is the typical fluctuation (see above).}
2541
2542 \item %
2543   \keydef
2544     {extendedTemp}{%
2545     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2546     Temperature for the extended degree of freedom (K)}{%
2547     positive decimal}{%
2548     thermostat temperature}{%
2549     Temperature used for calculating the coupling force constant of the
2550     extended variable (see \texttt{extendedFluctuation}) and, if needed, as a
2551     target temperature for extended Langevin dynamics (see
2552     \texttt{extendedLangevinDamping}). This should normally be left at its
2553     default value.}
2554
2555 \item %
2556   \keydef
2557     {extendedLangevinDamping}{%
2558     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2559     Damping factor for extended Langevin dynamics
2560     (ps$^{-1}$)}{%
2561     positive decimal}{%
2562     \texttt{1.0}}{%
2563     If this is non-zero, the extended degree of freedom undergoes Langevin dynamics
2564     at temperature \texttt{extendedTemp}. The friction force is minus
2565     \texttt{extendedLangevinDamping} times the velocity. This is useful because
2566     the extended dynamics coordinate may heat up in the transient
2567     non-equilibrium regime of ABF. Use moderate damping values, to limit
2568     viscous friction (potentially slowing down diffusive sampling) and stochastic
2569     noise (increasing the variance of statistical measurements). In
2570     doubt, use the default value.}
2571 \end{itemize}
2572
2573
2574 \cvsubsec{Backward-compatibility}{sec:colvar_compatibility}
2575
2576 \begin{itemize}
2577
2578 \item %
2579   \keydef
2580     {subtractAppliedForce}{%
2581     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2582     Do not include biasing forces in the total force for this colvar}{%
2583     boolean}{%
2584     \texttt{off}}{%
2585     If the colvar supports total force calculation (see \ref{sec:cvc_sys_forces}), all forces applied to this colvar by biases will be removed from the total force.
2586     This keyword allows to recover some of the ``system force'' calculation available in the Colvars module     before version 2016-08-10.
2587     Please note that removal of \emph{all} other external forces (including biasing forces applied to a         different colvar) is \emph{no longer supported}, due to changes in the underlying simulation engines (primarily NAMD).
2588     This option may be useful when continuing a previous simulation where the removal of external/applied forces is essential.
2589     \emph{For all new simulations, the use of this option is not recommended.}
2590 }
2591
2592 \end{itemize}
2593
2594
2595 \cvsubsec{Statistical analysis}{sec:colvar_acf}
2596
2597 Run-time calculations of statistical properties that depend explicitly on time can be performed for individual collective variables.
2598 Currently, several types of time correlation functions, running averages and running standard deviations are implemented.
2599 For run-time computation of histograms, please see the histogram bias (\ref{sec:colvarbias_histogram}).
2600
2601 \begin{itemize}
2602
2603 \item %
2604   \labelkey{colvar|corrFunc}
2605   \keydef
2606     {corrFunc}{%
2607     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2608     Calculate a time correlation function?}{%
2609     boolean}{%
2610     \texttt{off}}{%
2611     Whether or not a time correlaction function should be calculated
2612     for this colvar.}
2613
2614 \item %
2615   \key
2616     {corrFuncWithColvar}{%
2617     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2618     Colvar name for the correlation function}{%
2619     string}{%
2620     By default, the auto-correlation function (ACF) of this colvar,
2621     $\xi_{i}$, is calculated.  When this option is specified, the
2622     correlation function is calculated instead with another colvar,
2623     $\xi_{j}$, which must be of the same type (scalar, vector, or
2624     quaternion) as $\xi_{i}$.}
2625
2626 \item%
2627   \keydef
2628     {corrFuncType}{%
2629     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2630     Type of the correlation function}{%
2631     \texttt{velocity}, \texttt{coordinate} or
2632     \texttt{coordinate\_p2}}{%
2633     \texttt{velocity}}{%
2634     With \texttt{coordinate} or \texttt{velocity}, the correlation
2635     function $C_{i,j}(t)$~= $\left\langle \Pi\left(\xi_{i}(t_{0}),
2636         \xi_{j}(t_{0}+t)\right) \right\rangle$ is calculated between
2637     the variables $\xi_{i}$ and $\xi_{j}$, or their velocities.
2638     $\Pi(\xi_{i}, \xi_{j})$ is the scalar product when calculated
2639     between scalar or vector values, whereas for quaternions it is the
2640     cosine between the two corresponding rotation axes.  With
2641     \texttt{coordinate\_p2}, the second order Legendre polynomial,
2642     $(3\cos(\theta)^{2}-1)/2$, is used instead of the cosine.}
2643
2644 \item %
2645   \keydef
2646     {corrFuncNormalize}{%
2647     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2648     Normalize the time correlation function?}{%
2649     boolean}{%
2650     \texttt{on}}{%
2651     If enabled, the value of the correlation function at $t$~= 0
2652     is normalized to 1; otherwise, it equals to $\left\langle
2653       O\left(\xi_{i}, \xi_{j}\right) \right\rangle$.}
2654
2655 \item %
2656   \keydef
2657     {corrFuncLength}{%
2658     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2659     Length of the time correlation function}{%
2660     positive integer}{%
2661     \texttt{1000}}{%
2662     Length (in number of points) of the time correlation function.}
2663
2664 \item %
2665   \keydef
2666     {corrFuncStride}{%
2667     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2668     Stride of the time correlation function}{%
2669     positive integer}{%
2670     \texttt{1}}{%
2671     Number of steps between two values of the time correlation function.}
2672
2673 \item %
2674   \keydef
2675     {corrFuncOffset}{%
2676     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2677     Offset of the time correlation function}{%
2678     positive integer}{%
2679     \texttt{0}}{%
2680     The starting time (in number of steps) of the time correlation
2681     function (default: $t$~= 0).  \textbf{Note:} \emph{the value at $t$~= 0 is always
2682     used for the normalization}.}
2683
2684 \item %
2685   \keydef
2686     {corrFuncOutputFile}{%
2687     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2688     Output file for the time correlation function}{%
2689     UNIX filename}{%
2690     \outputName\texttt{.$<$name$>$.corrfunc.dat}}{%
2691     The time correlation function is saved in this file.}
2692
2693 \item %
2694   \labelkey{colvar|runAve}
2695   \keydef
2696     {runAve}{%
2697     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2698     Calculate the running average and standard deviation}{%
2699     boolean}{%
2700     \texttt{off}}{%
2701     Whether or not the running average and standard deviation should
2702     be calculated for this colvar.}
2703
2704 \item %
2705   \keydef
2706     {runAveLength}{%
2707     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2708     Length of the running average window}{%
2709     positive integer}{%
2710     \texttt{1000}}{%
2711     Length (in number of points) of the running average window.}
2712
2713 \item %
2714   \keydef
2715     {runAveStride}{%
2716     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2717     Stride of the running average window values}{%
2718     positive integer}{%
2719     \texttt{1}}{%
2720     Number of steps between two values within the running average window.}
2721
2722 \item %
2723   \keydef
2724     {runAveOutputFile}{%
2725     \texttt{colvar}}{%
2726     Output file for the running average and standard deviation}{%
2727     UNIX filename}{%
2728     \outputName\texttt{.$<$name$>$.runave.traj}}{%
2729     The running average and standard deviation are saved in this file.}
2730
2731 \end{itemize}
2732
2733
2734 \cvsec{Selecting atoms}{sec:colvar_atom_groups}
2735
2736 To define collective variables, atoms are usually selected as groups.  Each group is defined using an identifier that is unique in the context of the specific colvar component (e.g.~for a distance component, the two groups are \texttt{group1} and \texttt{group2}).
2737 The identifier is followed by a brace-delimited block containing selection keywords and other parameters, including an optional \texttt{name}:
2738
2739 \begin{itemize}
2740 \item \key
2741   {name}{%
2742   atom group}{%
2743   Unique name for the atom group}{%
2744   string}{%
2745   This parameter defines a unique name for this atom group, which can be referred to
2746   in the definition of other atom groups (including in other colvars) by invoking
2747   \texttt{atomsOfGroup} as a selection keyword.}
2748 \end{itemize}
2749
2750
2751 \cvsubsec{Atom selection keywords}{sec:colvar_atom_groups_sel}
2752
2753 Selection keywords may be used individually or in combination with each other, and each can be repeated any number of times.
2754 Selection is incremental: each keyword adds the corresponding atoms to the selection, so that different sets of atoms can be combined.
2755 However, atoms included by multiple keywords are only counted once.
2756 Below is an example configuration for an atom group called ``\texttt{atoms}''.
2757 \textbf{Note: }\emph{this is an unusually varied combination of selection keywords, demonstrating how they can be combined together: most simulations only use one of them.}\\
2758
2759 {%
2760 % verbatim can't appear within commands
2761 \noindent\ttfamily atoms \{\\
2762 \\
2763 \-~~\# add atoms 1 and 3 to this group (note: the first atom in the system is 1)\\
2764 \-~~atomNumbers \{ \\
2765 \-~~~~1 3\\
2766 \-~~\}\\
2767 \\
2768 \-~~\# add atoms starting from 20 up to and including 50\\
2769 \-~~atomNumbersRange  20-50\\
2770 }
2771 \cvnamebasedonly{{%
2772 \noindent\ttfamily\\
2773 \-~~\# add all the atoms with occupancy 2 in the file atoms.pdb\\
2774 \-~~atomsFile             atoms.pdb\\
2775 \-~~atomsCol              O\\
2776 \-~~atomsColValue         2.0\\
2777 \\
2778 \-~~\# add all the C-alphas within residues 11 to 20 of segments "PR1" and "PR2"\\
2779 \-~~psfSegID              PR1 PR2\\
2780 \-~~atomNameResidueRange  CA 11-20\\
2781 \-~~atomNameResidueRange  CA 11-20\\
2782 }}
2783 {\noindent\ttfamily\\
2784 \-~~\# add index group (requires a .ndx file to be provided globally)\\
2785 \-~~indexGroup Water\\
2786 \}\\}
2787
2788
2789 The resulting selection includes atoms 1 and 3, those between 20 and 50,\cvnamebasedonly{ the $\mathrm{C}_{\alpha}$ atoms between residues 11 and 20 of the two segments \texttt{PR1} and \texttt{PR2},} and those in the index group called ``Water''.
2790 The indices of this group are read from the file provided by the global keyword \refkey{indexFile}{Colvars-global|indexFile}.
2791
2792 \cvvmdonly{In the current version, the Colvars module does not manipulate VMD atom selections directly: however, these can be converted to atom groups within the Colvars configuration string, using selection keywords such as \texttt{atomNumbers}.}
2793 The complete list of selection keywords available in \MDENGINE{} is:
2794
2795 \begin{itemize}
2796
2797 \item %
2798   \key
2799     {atomNumbers}{%
2800     atom group}{%
2801     List of atom numbers}{%
2802     space-separated list of positive integers}{%
2803     This option adds to the group all the atoms whose numbers are in
2804     the list.  \emph{The number of the first atom in the system is 1: to convert from a VMD selection, use ``atomselect get serial''.}
2805   }
2806
2807 \item %
2808   \key
2809     {indexGroup}{%
2810     atom group}{%
2811     Name of index group to be used (GROMACS format)}{%
2812     string}{%
2813     If the name of an index file has been provided by \texttt{indexFile}, this option allows to select one index group from that file: the atoms from that index group will be used to define the current group.}
2814
2815 \item %
2816   \key
2817     {atomsOfGroup}{%
2818     atom group}{%
2819     Name of group defined previously}{%
2820     string}{%
2821     Refers to a group defined previously using its user-defined \texttt{name}.
2822     This adds all atoms of that named group to the current group.}
2823
2824 \item %
2825   \key
2826     {atomNumbersRange}{%
2827     atom group}{%
2828     Atoms within a number range}{%
2829     $<$Starting number$>$-$<$Ending number$>$}{%
2830     This option includes in the group all atoms whose numbers are within the range specified.  \emph{The number of the first atom in the system is 1.}
2831   }
2832
2833 \cvnamebasedonly{
2834 \item %
2835   \key
2836     {atomNameResidueRange}{%
2837     atom group}{%
2838     Named atoms within a range of residue numbers}{%
2839     $<$Atom name$>$ $<$Starting residue$>$-$<$Ending residue$>$}{%
2840     This option adds to the group all the atoms with the provided
2841     name, within residues in the given range.}
2842
2843 \item %
2844   \key
2845     {psfSegID}{%
2846     atom group}{%
2847     PSF segment identifier}{%
2848     space-separated list of strings (max 4 characters)}{%
2849     This option sets the PSF segment identifier for
2850     \texttt{atomNameResidueRange}.  Multiple values may be provided,
2851     which correspond to multiple instances of
2852     \texttt{atomNameResidueRange}, in order of their occurrence.
2853     This option is only necessary if a PSF topology file is used.}
2854
2855 \item %
2856   \key
2857     {atomsFile}{%
2858     atom group}{%
2859     PDB file name for atom selection}{%
2860     UNIX filename}{%
2861     This option selects atoms from the PDB file provided and adds them
2862     to the group according to numerical flags in the column
2863     \texttt{atomsCol}.  \textbf{Note:} \emph{the sequence of atoms in the PDB file
2864     provided must match that in the system's topology}.}
2865
2866 \item %
2867   \key
2868     {atomsCol}{%
2869     atom group}{%
2870     PDB column to use for atom selection flags}{%
2871     \texttt{O}, \texttt{B}, \texttt{X}, \texttt{Y}, or \texttt{Z}}{%
2872     This option specifies which PDB column in \texttt{atomsFile} is used to determine which atoms are to be included in the group.
2873   }
2874
2875 \item %
2876   \key
2877     {atomsColValue}{%
2878     atom group}{%
2879     Atom selection flag in the PDB column}{%
2880     positive decimal}{%
2881     If defined, this value in \texttt{atomsCol} identifies atoms in \texttt{atomsFile} that are included in the group.
2882     If undefined, all atoms with a non-zero value in \texttt{atomsCol} are included.}
2883 }
2884
2885 \item %
2886   \key
2887     {dummyAtom}{%
2888     atom group}{%
2889     Dummy atom position (\AA{})}{%
2890     \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplet}{%
2891     Instead of selecting any atom, this option makes the group a virtual particle at a fixed position in space.  This is useful e.g.~to replace a group's center of geometry with a user-defined position.}
2892
2893 \end{itemize}
2894
2895 \cvsubsec{Moving frame of reference.}{sec:colvar_atom_groups_ref_frame}
2896
2897 The following options define an automatic calculation of an optimal translation (\texttt{centerReference}) or optimal rotation (\texttt{rotateReference}), that superimposes the positions of this group to a provided set of reference coordinates.
2898 This can allow, for example, to effectively remove from certain colvars the effects of molecular tumbling and of diffusion.
2899 Given the set of atomic positions $\mathbf{x}_{i}$, the colvar $\xi$ can be defined on a set of roto-translated positions $\mathbf{x}_{i}' = R(\mathbf{x}_{i} - \mathbf{x}^{\mathrm{C}}) + \mathbf{x}^{\mathrm{ref}}$.
2900 $\mathbf{x}^{\mathrm{C}}$ is the geometric center of the $\mathbf{x}_{i}$, $R$ is the optimal rotation matrix to the reference positions and $\mathbf{x}^{\mathrm{ref}}$ is the geometric center of the reference positions.
2901
2902 Components that are defined based on pairwise distances are naturally invariant under global roto-translations.
2903 Other components are instead affected by global rotations or translations: however, they can be made invariant if they are expressed in the frame of reference of a chosen group of atoms, using the \texttt{centerReference} and \texttt{rotateReference} options.
2904 Finally, a few components are defined by convention using a roto-translated frame (e.g. the minimal RMSD): for these components, \texttt{centerReference} and \texttt{rotateReference} are enabled by default.
2905 In typical applications, the default settings result in the expected behavior.
2906
2907 \paragraph*{Warning on rotating frames of reference and periodic boundary conditions.}
2908 \texttt{rotateReference} affects coordinates that depend on minimum-image distances in periodic boundary conditions (PBC).
2909 After rotation of the coordinates, the periodic cell vectors become irrelevant: the rotated system is effectively non-periodic.
2910 A safe way to handle this is to ensure that the relevant inter-group distance vectors remain smaller than the half-size of the periodic cell.
2911 If this is not desirable, one should avoid the rotating frame of reference, and apply orientational restraints to the reference group instead, in order to keep the orientation of the reference group consistent with the orientation of the periodic cell.
2912
2913 \paragraph*{Warning on rotating frames of reference and ABF.}
2914 Note that \texttt{centerReference} and \texttt{rotateReference} may affect the Jacobian derivative of colvar components in a way that is not taken into account by default.
2915 Be careful when using these options in ABF simulations or when using total force values.
2916
2917 \begin{itemize}
2918
2919 \item %
2920   \keydef
2921     {centerReference}{%
2922     atom group}{%
2923     Implicitly remove translations for this group}{%
2924     boolean}{%
2925     \texttt{off}}{%
2926     If this option is \texttt{on}, the center of geometry of the group will be aligned with that of the reference positions provided by \cvnamebasedonly{either} \texttt{refPositions} or \texttt{refPositionsFile}.
2927     Colvar components will only have access to the aligned positions.
2928 \textbf{Note}: unless otherwise specified, \texttt{rmsd} and \texttt{eigenvector} set this option to \texttt{on} \emph{by default}.
2929 }
2930
2931 \item %
2932   \keydef
2933     {rotateReference}{%
2934     atom group}{%
2935     Implicitly remove rotations for this group}{%
2936     boolean}{%
2937     \texttt{off}}{%
2938     If this option is \texttt{on}, the coordinates of this group will be optimally superimposed to the reference positions provided by \cvnamebasedonly{either} \texttt{refPositions} or \texttt{refPositionsFile}.
2939     The rotation will be performed around the center of geometry if \texttt{centerReference} is \texttt{on}, or around the origin otherwise.
2940     The algorithm used is the same employed by the \texttt{orientation} colvar component~\cite{Coutsias2004}.
2941     Forces applied to the atoms of this group will also be implicitly rotated back to the original frame.
2942     \textbf{Note}: unless otherwise specified, \texttt{rmsd} and \texttt{eigenvector} set this option to \texttt{on} \emph{by default}.
2943 }
2944
2945 \item %
2946   \labelkey{atom-group|refPositions}
2947   \key
2948     {refPositions}{%
2949     atom group}{%
2950     Reference positions for fitting (\AA)}{%
2951     space-separated list of \texttt{(x, y, z)} triplets}{%
2952     \label{key:colvars:atom_group:refPositions}
2953     This option provides a list of reference coordinates for \texttt{centerReference} and/or \texttt{rotateReference}, and is mutually exclusive with \texttt{refPositionsFile}.
2954     If only \texttt{centerReference} is \texttt{on}, the list may contain a single (x, y, z) triplet; if also \texttt{rotateReference} is \texttt{on}, the list should be as long as the atom group, and \emph{its order must match the order in which atoms were defined}.
2955 }
2956
2957 \item %
2958   \labelkey{atom-group|refPositionsFile}
2959   \key
2960     {refPositionsFile}{%
2961     atom group}{%
2962     File containing the reference positions for fitting}{%
2963     UNIX filename}{%
2964     \label{key:colvars:atom_group:refPositionsFile}
2965     This option provides a list of reference coordinates for \texttt{centerReference} and/or \texttt{rotateReference}, and is mutually exclusive with \texttt{refPositions}.
2966     The acceptable file format is XYZ, which is read in double precision\cvnamebasedonly{, or PDB; \emph{the latter is discouraged if the precision of the reference coordinates is a concern}}.
2967     Atomic positions are read differently depending on the following scenarios:
2968     \textbf{(i)} the file contains exactly as many records as the atoms in the group: all positions are read in sequence;
2969     \textbf{(ii)} (most common case) the file contains coordinates for the entire system: only the positions corresponding to the numeric indices of the atom group are read\cvnamebasedonly{;
2970       \textbf{(iii)} if the file is a PDB file and \texttt{refPositionsCol} is specified, positions are read according to the value of the column \texttt{refPositionsCol} (which may be the same as \texttt{atomsCol})}.
2971     In each case, atoms are read from the file \emph{in order of increasing number}.
2972 }
2973
2974
2975 \cvnamebasedonly{
2976 \item %
2977   \key
2978     {refPositionsCol}{%
2979     atom group}{%
2980     PDB column containing atom flags}{%
2981     \texttt{O}, \texttt{B}, \texttt{X}, \texttt{Y}, or \texttt{Z}}{%
2982     Like \texttt{atomsCol} for \texttt{atomsFile}, indicates which column to use to identify the atoms in \texttt{refPositionsFile} (if this is a PDB file).}
2983
2984 \item %
2985   \key
2986     {refPositionsColValue}{%
2987     atom group}{%
2988     Atom selection flag in the PDB column}{%
2989     positive decimal}{%
2990     Analogous to \texttt{atomsColValue}, but applied to \texttt{refPositionsCol}.}
2991 }
2992
2993 \item %
2994   \labelkey{atom-group|fittingGroup} %
2995   \keydef
2996     {fittingGroup}{%
2997     atom group}{%
2998     Use an alternate set of atoms to define the roto-translation}{%
2999     Block \texttt{fittingGroup \{ ... \}}}{%
3000     This group itself}{%
3001     If either \texttt{centerReference} or \texttt{rotateReference} is defined, this keyword defines an alternate atom group to calculate the optimal roto-translation.
3002     Use this option to define a continuous rotation if the structure of the group involved changes significantly (a typical symptom would be the message ``Warning: discontinuous rotation!'').
3003
3004 \cvnamebasedonly{
3005     The following example illustrates the syntax of \texttt{fittingGroup}: a group called ``\texttt{atoms}'' is defined, including 8 C$_{\alpha}$ atoms of a protein of 100 residues.
3006     An optimal roto-translation is calculated automatically by fitting the C$_{\alpha}$ trace of the rest of the protein onto the coordinates provided by a PDB file.}
3007
3008 {%
3009 \noindent\ttfamily
3010 \# Example: defining a group "atoms", with its coordinates expressed \\
3011 \# on a roto-translated frame of reference defined by a second group\\
3012 atoms \{\\
3013 \\
3014 \-~~psfSegID              PROT\\
3015 \-~~atomNameResidueRange  CA 41-48\\
3016 \\
3017 \-~~centerReference yes\\
3018 \-~~rotateReference yes\\
3019 \-~~fittingGroup \{\\
3020 \-~~~~\# define the frame by fitting the rest of the protein\\
3021 \-~~~~psfSegID              PROT PROT\\
3022 \-~~~~atomNameResidueRange  CA  1-40\\
3023 \-~~~~atomNameResidueRange  CA 49-100\\
3024 \-~~\} \\
3025 \-~~refPositionsFile all.pdb  \# can be the entire system\\
3026 \}\\}
3027 }
3028 \end{itemize}
3029
3030 The following two options have default values appropriate for the vast majority of applications, and are only provided to support rare, special cases.
3031 \begin{itemize}
3032
3033 \item %
3034   \keydef
3035     {enableFitGradients}{%
3036     atom group}{%
3037     Include the roto-translational contribution to colvar gradients}{%
3038     boolean}{%
3039     \texttt{on}}{%
3040     When either \texttt{centerReference} or \texttt{rotateReference} is on,
3041     the gradients of some colvars include terms proportional to
3042     $\partial{}R/\partial\mathbf{x}_{i}$ (rotational gradients) and
3043     $\partial\mathbf{x}^{\mathrm{C}}/\partial\mathbf{x}_{i}$ (translational gradients).
3044     By default, these terms are calculated and included in the total gradients;
3045     if this option is set to \texttt{off}, they are neglected.
3046     In the case of a minimum RMSD component, this flag is automatically disabled
3047     because the contributions of those derivatives to the gradients cancel out.
3048 }
3049
3050 \item %
3051   \keydef
3052     {enableForces}{%
3053     atom group}{%
3054     Apply forces from this colvar to this group}{%
3055     boolean}{%
3056     \texttt{on}}{%
3057     If this option is \texttt{off}, no forces are applied the atoms in the group.
3058     Other forces are not affected (i.e. those
3059     from the MD engine, from other colvars, and other external forces).
3060     For dummy atoms, this option is \texttt{off} by default.
3061  }
3062
3063 \end{itemize}
3064
3065
3066 \cvsubsec{Treatment of periodic boundary conditions.}{sec:colvar_atom_groups_wrapping}
3067
3068 \cvnamdonly{
3069  In simulations with periodic boundary conditions, NAMD maintains
3070   the coordinates of all the atoms within a molecule contiguous to
3071   each other (i.e.~there are no spurious ``jumps'' in the molecular
3072   bonds).  The Colvars module relies on this when calculating a group's
3073   center of geometry, but this condition may fail if the group spans
3074   different molecules.  In that case, writing the NAMD output and restart files
3075   using \texttt{wrapAll} or \texttt{wrapWater} could produce wrong results
3076   when a simulation run is continued from a previous one.  
3077   The user should then determine, according to which
3078   type of colvars are being calculated, whether \texttt{wrapAll} or
3079   \texttt{wrapWater} can be enabled.
3080
3081   In general, internal coordinate wrapping by NAMD does not affect the calculation of colvars if each atom group satisfies one or more of the following:
3082 }
3083 \cvlammpsonly{
3084 In simulations with periodic boundary conditions, many of the implemented colvar components rely on the fact that each position within a group of atoms is at the nearest periodic image from the center of geometry of the group itself.
3085 However, due to the internal wrapping of individual atomic positions done by LAMMPS, this assumption is broken if the group straddles one of the unit cell's boundaries.
3086 For this reason, within the Colvars module all coordinates are unwrapped by default to avoid discontinuities (see \texttt{unwrap} keyword in \ref{sec:colvars_mdengine_parameters}).
3087
3088 The user should determine whether maintaining the default value of \texttt{unwrap}, depending on the specifics of each system.
3089 In general, internal coordinate wrapping by LAMMPS does not affect the calculation of colvars if each atom group satisfies one or more of the following:
3090 }
3091 \cvvmdonly{
3092   When periodic boundary conditions are defined, the Colvars module requires that the coordinates of each molecular fragment are contiguous, without ``jumps'' when a fragment is partially wrapped near a periodic boundary.
3093   The Colvars module relies on this assumption when calculating a group's center of geometry, but the condition may fail if the group spans different molecules.
3094   In general, coordinate wrapping does not affect the calculation of colvars if each atom group satisfies one or more of the following:
3095 }
3096
3097 \begin{enumerate}
3098   \item[\emph{i)}] it is composed by only one atom;
3099   \item[\emph{ii)}] it is used by a colvar component which does not make use of its center of geometry, but only of pairwise distances (\texttt{distanceInv}, \texttt{coordNum}, \texttt{hBond}, \texttt{alpha}, \texttt{dihedralPC});
3100   \item[\emph{iii)}]  it is used by a colvar component that ignores the ill-defined Cartesian components of its center of mass (such as the $x$ and $y$ components of a membrane's center of mass modeled with \texttt{distanceZ})\cvnamdonly{;
3101   \item[\emph{iv)}] it has all of its atoms within the same molecular fragment%
3102 }.
3103 \end{enumerate}
3104 \cvvmdonly{If none of these conditions are met, wrapping may affect the calculation of collective variables: a possible solution is to use \texttt{pbc wrap} or \texttt{pbc unwrap} prior to processing a trajectory with the Colvars module.}
3105
3106
3107 \cvsubsec{Performance of a Colvars calculation based on group size.}{sec:colvar_atom_groups_scaling}
3108
3109 In simulations performed with message-passing programs (such as NAMD or LAMMPS), the calculation of energy and forces is distributed (i.e., parallelized) across multiple nodes, as well as over the processor cores of each node.
3110 When Colvars is enabled, certain atomic coordinates are collected on a single node, where the calculation of collective variables and of their biases is executed.
3111 This means that for simulations over large numbers of nodes, a Colvars calculation may produce a significant overhead, coming from the costs of transmitting atomic coordinates to one node and of processing them.
3112 \cvnamdonly{The latency-tolerant design and dynamic load balancing of NAMD may alleviate both factors, but a noticeable performance impact may be observed.}
3113
3114 Performance can be improved in multiple ways:
3115 \begin{itemize}
3116 \item The calculation of variables, components and biases can be distributed over the processor cores of the node where the Colvars module is executed.
3117   Currently, an equal weight is assigned to each colvar, or to each component of those colvars that include more than one component.
3118   The performance of simulations that use many colvars or components is improved automatically.
3119   For simulations that use a single large colvar, it may be advisable to partition it in multiple components, which will be then distributed across the available cores.
3120   \cvnamdonly{In NAMD, this feature is enabled in all binaries compiled using SMP builds of Charm++ with the CkLoop extension.}
3121   \cvlammpsonly{In LAMMPS, this feature is supported automatically when LAMMPS is compiled with OpenMP support.}
3122   If printed, the message ``SMP parallelism is available.'' indicates the availability of the option\cvvmdonly{ (will be supported in a future relase of VMD)}.
3123   If available, the option is turned on by default, but may be disabled using the keyword \refkey{smp}{Colvars-global|smp} if required for debugging.
3124
3125 \cvnamdonly{
3126   % Use the following command to identify them:
3127   % grep -B10 'provide(f_cvc_com_based' * |grep '\:\:'|grep '(std::string const &conf)'
3128 \item NAMD also offers a parallelized calculation of the centers of mass of groups of atoms.
3129   This option is on by default for all components that are simple functions of centers of mass, and is controlled by the keyword \refkey{scalable}{sec:cvc_common}.
3130   When supported, the message ``Will enable scalable calculation for group \ldots'' is printed for each group.
3131 }
3132
3133 \item As a general rule, the size of atom groups should be kept relatively small (up to a few thousands of atoms, depending on the size of the entire system in comparison).
3134 To gain an estimate of the computational cost of a large colvar, one can use a test calculation of the same colvar in VMD (hint: use the \texttt{time} Tcl command to measure the cost of running \texttt{cv update}).
3135 \end{itemize}
3136
3137
3138 \cvsec{Biasing and analysis methods}{sec:colvarbias}
3139
3140 All of the biasing and analysis methods implemented recognize the following options:
3141 \begin{itemize}
3142
3143 \item %
3144   \labelkey{colvarbias|name}
3145   \keydef
3146     {name}{%
3147     colvar bias}{%
3148     Identifier for the bias}{%
3149     string}{%
3150     \texttt{$<$type of bias$><$bias index$>$}}{%
3151     This string is used to identify the bias or analysis method in
3152     output messages and to name some output files.}
3153
3154 \item %
3155   \labelkey{colvarbias|colvars}
3156   \key
3157     {colvars}{%
3158     colvar bias}{%
3159     Collective variables involved}{%
3160     space-separated list of colvar names}{%
3161     This option selects by name all the colvars to which this bias or
3162     analysis will be applied.}
3163
3164 \item %
3165   \labelkey{colvarbias|outputEnergy}
3166   \keydef
3167     {outputEnergy}{%
3168     colvar bias}{%
3169     Write the current bias energy to the trajectory file}{%
3170     boolean}{%
3171     \texttt{off}}{%
3172     If this option is chosen and  \texttt{colvarsTrajFrequency} is not zero, the current value of the biasing energy will be written to the trajectory file during the simulation.
3173 }
3174
3175 \end{itemize}
3176
3177 In addition, restraint biases (\ref{sec:colvarbias_harmonic}, \ref{sec:colvarbias_harmonic_walls}, \ref{sec:colvarbias_linear}, ...) and metadynamics biases (\ref{sec:colvarbias_meta}) offer the following optional keywords, which allow the use of thermodynamic integration (TI) to compute potentials of mean force (PMFs).  In adaptive biasing force (ABF) biases (\ref{sec:colvarbias_abf}) the same keywords are not recognized because their functionality is always included.
3178
3179 \begin{itemize}
3180
3181 \item %
3182   \labelkey{colvarbias|writeTIPMF}
3183   \keydef
3184     {writeTIPMF}{%
3185     colvar bias}{%
3186     Write the PMF computed by thermodynamic integration}{%
3187     boolean}{%
3188     \texttt{off}}{%
3189     If the bias is applied to a variable that supports the calculation of total forces (see \refkey{outputTotalForce}{sec:colvar} and \ref{sec:cvc_sys_forces}), this option allows calculating the corresponding PMF by thermodynanic integration, and writing it to the file \outputName{}\texttt{.$<$name$>$.ti.pmf}, where \texttt{$<$name$>$} is the name of the bias.
3190     The total force includes the forces applied to the variable by all bias, except those from this bias itself.
3191     If any bias applies time-dependent forces besides the one using this option, an error is raised.
3192 }
3193
3194
3195 \item %
3196   \labelkey{colvarbias|writeTISamples}
3197   \keydef
3198     {writeTISamples}{%
3199     colvar bias}{%
3200     Write the free-energy gradient samples}{%
3201     boolean}{%
3202     \texttt{off}}{%
3203     This option allows to compute total forces for use with thermodynamic integration as done by the keyword \refkey{writeTIPMF}{sec:colvarbias}.
3204     The names of the files containing the variables' histogram and mean thermodyunamic forces are \outputName\texttt{.$<$name$>$.ti.count} and \outputName\texttt{.$<$name$>$.ti.grad}, respectively: these can be used by \texttt{abf\_integrate} or similar utility.
3205     This option on by default when \texttt{writeTIPMF} is on, but can be enabled separately if the bias is applied to more than one variable, making not possible the direct integration of the PMF at runtime.
3206     If any bias applies time-dependent forces besides the one using this option, an error is raised.
3207 }
3208
3209 \end{itemize}
3210
3211
3212 \cvsubsec{Adaptive Biasing Force}{sec:colvarbias_abf}
3213
3214 For a full description of the Adaptive Biasing Force method, see
3215 reference~\cite{Darve2008}. For details about this implementation,
3216 see references~\cite{Henin2004} and \cite{Henin2010}. \textbf{When
3217 publishing research that makes use of this functionality, please cite
3218 references~\cite{Darve2008} and \cite{Henin2010}.}
3219
3220 An alternate usage of this feature is the application of custom
3221 tabulated biasing potentials to one or more colvars. See
3222 \texttt{inputPrefix} and \texttt{updateBias} below.
3223
3224 Combining ABF with the extended Lagrangian feature (\ref{sec:colvar_extended})
3225 of the variables produces the extended-system ABF variant of the method
3226 (\ref{sec:eABF}).
3227
3228 ABF is based on the thermodynamic integration (TI) scheme for
3229 computing free energy profiles. The free energy as a function
3230 of a set of collective variables $\bm{\xi}=(\xi_{i})_{i\in[1,n]}$
3231 is defined from the canonical distribution of $\bm{\xi}$, ${\mathcal P}(\bm{\xi})$:
3232
3233 \begin{equation}
3234   \label{eq:free}
3235   A(\bm{\xi}) = -\frac{1}{\beta} \ln {\mathcal P}(\bm{\xi}) + A_0
3236 \end{equation}
3237
3238 In the TI formalism, the free energy is obtained from its gradient, 
3239 which is generally calculated in the form of the average of a force
3240 $\bm{F}_\xi$ exerted on $\bm{\xi}$, taken over an iso-$\bm{\xi}$ surface:
3241
3242 \begin{equation}
3243   \label{eq:gradient}
3244   \bm{\nabla}_\xi A(\bm{\xi}) = \left\langle -\bm{F}_\xi \right\rangle_{\bm{\xi}}
3245 \end{equation}
3246
3247 Several formulae that take the form of~(\ref{eq:gradient}) have been
3248 proposed.  This implementation relies partly on the classic
3249 formulation~\cite{Carter1989}, and partly on a more versatile scheme
3250 originating in a work by Ruiz-Montero et al.~\cite{Ruiz-Montero1997},
3251 generalized by den Otter~\cite{denOtter2000} and extended to multiple
3252 variables by Ciccotti et al.~\cite{Ciccotti2005}.  Consider a system
3253 subject to constraints of the form $\sigma_{k}(\vx) = 0$.  Let
3254 $(\bm{v}_{i})_{i\in[1,n]}$ be arbitrarily chosen vector fields
3255 ($\mathbb{R}^{3N}\rightarrow\mathbb{R}^{3N}$) verifying, for all $i$,
3256 $j$, and $k$:
3257
3258 \begin{eqnarray}
3259 \label{eq:ortho_gradient}
3260 \bm{v}_{i} \cdot \gradx \xi_{j}    & = & \delta_{ij}\\
3261 \label{eq:ortho_constraints}
3262 \bm{v}_{i} \cdot \gradx \sigma_{k} & = & 0
3263 \end{eqnarray}
3264
3265 then the following holds~\cite{Ciccotti2005}:
3266
3267 \begin{equation}
3268 \label{eq:gradient_vector}
3269 \frac{\partial A}{\partial \xi_{i}} = \left\langle \bm{v}_{i} \cdot \gradx V
3270 - k_B T \gradx \cdot \bm{v}_{i} \right\rangle_{\bm{\xi}}
3271 \end{equation}
3272
3273 where $V$ is the potential energy function.
3274 $\bm{v}_{i}$ can be interpreted as the direction along which the force
3275 acting on variable $\xi_{i}$ is measured, whereas the second term in the
3276 average corresponds to the geometric entropy contribution that appears
3277 as a Jacobian correction in the classic formalism~\cite{Carter1989}.
3278 Condition~(\ref{eq:ortho_gradient}) states that the direction along
3279 which the total force on $\xi_{i}$ is measured is orthogonal to the
3280 gradient of $\xi_{j}$, which means that the force measured on $\xi_{i}$
3281 does not act on $\xi_{j}$.
3282
3283 Equation~(\ref{eq:ortho_constraints}) implies that constraint forces
3284 are orthogonal to the directions along which the free energy gradient is
3285 measured, so that the measurement is effectively performed on unconstrained
3286 degrees of freedom.
3287 \cvnamdonly{In NAMD, constraints are typically applied to the lengths of
3288 bonds involving hydrogen atoms, for example in TIP3P water molecules (parameter \texttt{rigidBonds}\cvnamdugonly{, section~\ref{section:rigidBonds}}).}
3289
3290 In the framework of ABF,
3291 ${\bf F}_\xi$ is accumulated in bins of finite size $\delta \xi$,
3292 thereby providing an estimate of the free energy gradient
3293 according to equation~({\ref{eq:gradient}}).
3294 The biasing force applied along the collective variables
3295 to overcome free energy barriers is calculated as:
3296
3297 \begin{equation}
3298   \label{eq:abf}
3299   {\bf F}^{\rm ABF} = \alpha(N_\xi) \times \gradx \widetilde A(\bm{\xi})
3300 \end{equation}
3301
3302 where $\gradx \widetilde A$ denotes the current estimate of the
3303 free energy gradient at the current point $\bm{\xi}$ in the collective
3304 variable subspace, and $\alpha(N_\xi)$ is a scaling factor that is ramped
3305 from 0 to 1 as the local number of samples $N_\xi$ increases
3306 to prevent nonequilibrium effects in the early phase of the simulation,
3307 when the gradient estimate has a large variance.
3308 See the \texttt{fullSamples} parameter below for details.
3309
3310 As sampling of the phase space proceeds, the estimate
3311 $\gradx \widetilde A$ is progressively refined. The biasing
3312 force introduced in the equations of motion guarantees that in
3313 the bin centered around $\bm{\xi}$,
3314 the forces acting along the selected collective variables average
3315 to zero over time. Eventually, as the undelying free energy surface is canceled
3316 by the adaptive bias, evolution of the system along $\bm{\xi}$
3317 is governed mainly by diffusion.
3318 Although this implementation of ABF can in principle be used in 
3319 arbitrary dimension, a higher-dimension collective variable space is likely
3320 to result in sampling difficulties.
3321 Most commonly, the number of variables is one or two.
3322
3323
3324 \cvsubsubsec{ABF requirements on collective variables}{sec:colvarbias_abf_req}
3325
3326 The following conditions must be met for an ABF simulation to be possible and
3327 to produce an accurate estimate of the free energy profile.
3328 Note that these requirements do not apply when using the extended-system
3329 ABF method (\ref{sec:eABF}).
3330
3331 \begin{enumerate}
3332  \item \emph{Only linear combinations} of colvar components can be used in ABF calculations.
3333  \item \emph{Availability of total forces} is necessary. The following colvar components
3334 can be used in ABF calculations:
3335 \texttt{distance}, \texttt{distance\_xy}, \texttt{distance\_z}, \texttt{angle},
3336 \texttt{dihedral}, \texttt{gyration},  \texttt{rmsd} and \texttt{eigenvector}.
3337 Atom groups may not be replaced by dummy atoms, unless they are excluded
3338 from the force measurement by specifying \texttt{oneSiteTotalForce}, if available.
3339  \item \emph{Mutual orthogonality of colvars}. In a multidimensional ABF calculation,
3340 equation~(\ref{eq:ortho_gradient}) must be satisfied for any two colvars $\xi_{i}$ and $\xi_{j}$.
3341 Various cases fulfill this orthogonality condition:
3342 \begin{itemize}
3343  \item $\xi_{i}$ and $\xi_{j}$ are based on non-overlapping sets of atoms.
3344  \item atoms involved in the force measurement on $\xi_{i}$ do not participate in
3345 the definition of $\xi_{j}$. This can be obtained using the option \texttt{oneSiteTotalForce}
3346 of the \texttt{distance}, \texttt{angle}, and \texttt{dihedral} components
3347 (example: Ramachandran angles $\phi$, $\psi$).
3348  \item $\xi_{i}$ and $\xi_{j}$ are orthogonal by construction. Useful cases are the sum and
3349 difference of two components, or \texttt{distance\_z} and \texttt{distance\_xy} using the same axis.
3350 \end{itemize}
3351  \item \emph{Mutual orthogonality of components}: when several components are combined into a colvar,
3352 it is assumed that their vectors $\bm{v}_{i}$ (equation~(\ref{eq:gradient_vector}))
3353 are mutually orthogonal. The cases described for colvars in the previous paragraph apply.
3354 % (example: difference of distances).
3355  \item \emph{Orthogonality of colvars and constraints}: equation~\ref{eq:ortho_constraints} can
3356 be satisfied in two simple ways, if either no constrained atoms are involved in the force measurement
3357 (see point 3 above) or pairs of atoms joined by a constrained bond are part of an \textit{atom group}
3358 which only intervenes through its center (center of mass or geometric center) in the force measurement.
3359 In the latter case, the contributions of the two atoms to the left-hand side of equation~\ref{eq:ortho_constraints}
3360 cancel out. For example, all atoms of a rigid TIP3P water molecule can safely be included in an atom
3361 group used in a \texttt{distance} component.
3362 \end{enumerate}
3363
3364
3365 \cvsubsubsec{Parameters for ABF}{sec:colvarbias_abf_params}
3366
3367 ABF depends on parameters from collective variables to define the grid on which free
3368 energy gradients are computed. In the direction of each colvar, the grid ranges from
3369 \texttt{lowerBoundary} to \texttt{upperBoundary}, and the bin width (grid spacing)
3370 is set by the \refkey{width}{colvar|width} parameter.
3371 The following specific parameters can be set in the ABF configuration block:
3372
3373 \begin{itemize}
3374
3375 \item \dupkey{name}{\texttt{abf}}{sec:colvarbias}{biasing and analysis methods}
3376 \item \dupkey{colvars}{\texttt{abf}}{sec:colvarbias}{biasing and analysis methods}
3377 %\item \dupkey{outputEnergy}{sec:colvarbias}{biasing and analysis methods}
3378
3379 \item \keydef{fullSamples}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3380     Number of samples in a bin prior
3381     to application of the ABF}
3382   {positive integer}
3383   {200}
3384   {To avoid nonequilibrium effects due to large fluctuations of the force exerted along the
3385    colvars, it is recommended to apply a biasing force only after a the estimate has started
3386    converging. If \texttt{fullSamples} is non-zero, the applied biasing force is scaled by a factor
3387    $\alpha(N_\xi)$ between 0 and 1.
3388    If the number of samples $N_\xi$ in the current bin is higher than \texttt{fullSamples},
3389    the factor is one. If it is less than half of \texttt{fullSamples}, the factor is zero and
3390    no bias is applied. Between those two thresholds, the factor follows a linear ramp from
3391    0 to 1: $\alpha(N_\xi) =(2N_\xi/\mathrm{fullSamples})-1$}.
3392
3393 \item \keydef{maxForce}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3394     Maximum magnitude of the ABF force}
3395   {positive decimals (one per colvar)}
3396   {disabled}
3397   {This option enforces a cap on the magnitude of the biasing force effectively applied
3398    by this ABF bias on each colvar. This can be useful in the presence of singularities
3399    in the PMF such as hard walls, where the discretization of the average force becomes
3400    very inaccurate, causing the colvar's diffusion to get ``stuck'' at the singularity.
3401    To enable this cap, provide one non-negative value for each colvar. The unit of force
3402    is \cvnamdonly{kcal/mol}\cvvmdonly{kcal/mol}\cvlammpsonly{the unit of energy specified by \texttt{units}} divided by the colvar unit.}
3403
3404 \item \keydef{hideJacobian}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3405     Remove geometric entropy term from calculated
3406     free energy gradient?}
3407   {boolean}
3408   {\texttt{no}}
3409   {In a few special cases, most notably distance-based variables, an alternate definition of
3410     the potential of mean force is traditionally used, which excludes the Jacobian
3411     term describing the effect of geometric entropy on the distribution of the variable.
3412     This results, for example, in particle-particle potentials of mean force being flat
3413     at large separations.
3414     Setting this parameter to \texttt{yes} causes the output data to follow that convention,
3415     by removing this contribution from the output gradients while
3416     applying internally the corresponding correction to ensure uniform sampling.
3417     It is not allowed for colvars with multiple components.}
3418
3419 \item \keydef{outputFreq}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3420     Frequency (in timesteps) at which ABF data files are refreshed}
3421   {positive integer}
3422   {Colvars module restart frequency}
3423   {The files containing the free energy gradient estimate and sampling histogram
3424     (and the PMF in one-dimensional calculations) are written on disk at the given
3425     time interval.}
3426
3427 \item \keydef{historyFreq}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3428     Frequency (in timesteps) at which ABF history files are
3429   accumulated}
3430   {positive integer}
3431   {0}
3432   {If this number is non-zero, the free energy gradient estimate and sampling histogram
3433     (and the PMF in one-dimensional calculations) are appended to files on disk at
3434     the given time interval. History file names use the same prefix as output files, with
3435     ``\texttt{.hist}'' appended.}
3436
3437 \item \key{inputPrefix}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3438     Filename prefix for reading ABF data}
3439   {list of strings}
3440   {If this parameter is set, for each item in the list, ABF tries to read
3441     a gradient and a sampling files named \texttt{$<$inputPrefix$>$.grad}
3442     and \texttt{$<$inputPrefix$>$.count}. This is done at
3443     startup and sets the initial state of the ABF algorithm.
3444     The data from all provided files is combined appropriately.
3445     Also, the grid definition (min and max values, width) need not be the same
3446     that for the current run. This command is useful to piece together
3447     data from simulations in different regions of collective variable space,
3448     or change the colvar boundary values and widths. Note that it is not
3449     recommended to use it to switch to a smaller width, as that will leave
3450     some bins empty in the finer data grid.
3451     This option is NOT compatible with reading the data from a restart file\cvnamdonly{ (\texttt{colvarsInput} option of the NAMD config file)}\cvvmdonly{ (\texttt{cv load} command)}\cvlammpsonly{ (\texttt{input} keyword of the \texttt{fix ID group-ID colvars} command)}.}
3452
3453 \item \keydef{applyBias}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3454     Apply the ABF bias?}
3455   {boolean}
3456   {\texttt{yes}}
3457   { If this is set to no, the calculation proceeds normally but the adaptive
3458     biasing force is not applied. Data is still collected to compute
3459     the free energy gradient. This is mostly intended for testing purposes, and should
3460     not be used in routine simulations.
3461   }
3462
3463 \item \keydef{updateBias}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3464     Update the ABF bias?}
3465   {boolean}
3466   {\texttt{yes}}
3467   { If this is set to no, the initial biasing force (e.g. read from a restart file or
3468     through \texttt{inputPrefix}) is not updated during the simulation.
3469     As a result, a constant bias is applied. This can be used to apply a custom, tabulated
3470     biasing potential to any combination of colvars. To that effect, one should prepare
3471     a gradient file containing the gradient of the potential to be applied (negative
3472     of the bias force), and a count file containing only values greater than
3473     \texttt{fullSamples}. These files must match the grid parameters of the colvars.
3474   }
3475 \end{itemize}
3476
3477 \cvnamdonly{
3478 \cvsubsubsec{Multiple-replica ABF}{sec:colvarbias_abf_shared}
3479 \label{sec:mw-ABF}
3480
3481 \begin{itemize}
3482 \item \keydef{shared}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3483     Apply multiple-replica ABF, sharing force samples among the replicas?}
3484   {boolean}
3485   {\texttt{no}}
3486   { This is command requires that NAMD be compiled and executed with multiple-replica
3487     support.
3488     If \texttt{shared} is set to yes, the total force samples will be synchronized among all replicas
3489     at intervals defined by \texttt{sharedFreq}.
3490     This implements the multiple-walker ABF scheme described in \cite{Minoukadeh2010}; this
3491     implementation is documented in \cite{Comer2014c}.
3492     Thus, it is as if total force samples among all replicas are
3493     gathered in a single shared buffer, which why the algorithm is referred to as shared ABF.
3494     Shared ABF allows all replicas to benefit from the sampling done by other replicas and can lead to faster convergence of the biasing force.
3495   }
3496
3497 \item \keydef{sharedFreq}{\texttt{abf}}{%
3498     Frequency (in timesteps) at which force samples are synchronized among the replicas}
3499   {positive integer}
3500   {\texttt{outputFreq}}
3501   {
3502   In the current implementation of shared ABF, each replica maintains a separate
3503   buffer of total force samples that determine the biasing force.
3504   Every \texttt{sharedFreq} steps, the replicas communicate the samples that
3505   have been gathered since the last synchronization time, ensuring all replicas
3506   apply a similar biasing force.
3507   }
3508 \end{itemize}
3509 }
3510
3511 \cvsubsubsec{Output files}{sec:colvarbias_abf_output}
3512
3513 The ABF bias produces the following files, all in multicolumn text format:
3514 \begin{itemize}
3515 \item \outputName\texttt{.grad}: current estimate of the free energy gradient (grid),
3516   in multicolumn;
3517 \item \outputName\texttt{.count}: histogram of samples collected, on the same grid;
3518 \item \outputName\texttt{.pmf}: only for one-dimensional calculations, integrated
3519   free energy profile or PMF.
3520 \end{itemize}
3521
3522 If several ABF biases are defined concurrently, their name is inserted to produce
3523 unique filenames for output, as in \outputName\texttt{.abf1.grad}.
3524 This should not be done routinely and could lead to meaningless results:
3525 only do it if you know what you are doing!
3526
3527 If the colvar space has been partitioned into sections (\emph{windows}) in which independent
3528 ABF simulations have been run, the resulting data can be merged using the
3529 \texttt{inputPrefix} option described above (a run of 0 steps is enough).
3530
3531
3532 \cvsubsubsec{Post-processing: reconstructing a multidimensional free energy surface}{sec:colvarbias_abf_post}
3533
3534 If a one-dimensional calculation is performed, the estimated free energy
3535 gradient is automatically integrated and a potential of mean force is written
3536 under the file name \texttt{<outputName>.pmf}, in a plain text format that
3537 can be read by most data plotting and analysis programs (e.g. gnuplot).
3538
3539 In dimension 2 or greater, integrating the discretized gradient becomes non-trivial. The
3540 standalone utility \texttt{abf\_integrate} is provided to perform that task.
3541 \texttt{abf\_integrate} reads the gradient data and uses it to perform a Monte-Carlo (M-C)
3542 simulation in discretized collective variable space (specifically, on the same grid
3543 used by ABF to discretize the free energy gradient).
3544 By default, a history-dependent bias (similar in spirit to metadynamics) is used:
3545 at each M-C step, the bias at the current position is incremented by a preset amount
3546 (the \emph{hill height}).
3547 Upon convergence, this bias counteracts optimally the underlying gradient;
3548 it is negated to obtain the estimate of the free energy surface.
3549
3550 \texttt{abf\_integrate} is invoked using the command-line:\\
3551 {\small \noindent\ttfamily
3552 abf\_integrate <gradient\_file> [-n <nsteps>] [-t <temp>] [-m (0|1)] [-h <hill\_height>] [-f <factor>]
3553 }
3554
3555 The gradient file name is provided first, followed by other parameters in any order.
3556 They are described below, with their default value in square brackets:
3557 \begin{itemize}
3558 \setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}
3559 \item \texttt{-n}: number of M-C steps to be performed; by default, a minimal number of
3560 steps is chosen based on the size of the grid, and the integration runs until a convergence
3561 criterion is satisfied (based on the RMSD between the target gradient and the real PMF gradient)
3562 \item \texttt{-t}: temperature for M-C sampling (unrelated to the simulation temperature)
3563   [500~K]
3564 \item \texttt{-m}: use metadynamics-like biased sampling? (0 = false) [1]
3565 \item \texttt{-h}: increment for the history-dependent bias (``hill height'') [0.01~kcal/mol]
3566 \item \texttt{-f}: if non-zero, this factor is used to scale the increment stepwise in the 
3567   second half of the M-C sampling to refine the free energy estimate [0.5]
3568 \end{itemize}
3569
3570 Using the default values of all parameters should give reasonable results in most cases.
3571