Removed the fem.tex section, because it has a separate manual now.
authorMilind Bhandarkar <milind@cs.uiuc.edu>
Thu, 14 Dec 2000 09:00:35 +0000 (09:00 +0000)
committerMilind Bhandarkar <milind@cs.uiuc.edu>
Thu, 14 Dec 2000 09:00:35 +0000 (09:00 +0000)
doc/libraries/fem.tex [deleted file]
doc/libraries/manual.tex

diff --git a/doc/libraries/fem.tex b/doc/libraries/fem.tex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index f95c0dd..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,88 +0,0 @@
-The Finite Element Method is a commonly used modeling and analysis tool for
-predicting behavior of real-world objects with respect to mechanical stresses,
-vibrations, heat conduction etc. It works by modeling a structure with a
-complex geometry into a number of small ``elements'' connected at ``nodes''.
-This process is called ``meshing''. Meshes can be structured or unstructured.
-Structured meshes have equal connectivity for each node, while unstructured
-meshes have different connectivity.  Unstructured meshes are more commonly used
-for FEM.
-
-The FEM solver solves a set of matrix equations that approximate the physical
-phenomena under study. For example, in stress analysis, the system of equations
-is:
-
-$$
-F = k x
-$$
-
-where F is the stress, k is the stiffness matrix, and x is the displacement.
-The stiffness matrix is formed by superposing such equations for all the
-elements. When using FEM for dynamic analysis, these equations are solved in
-every iteration, advancing time by a small ``timestep''. In explicit FEM,
-forces on elements are calculated from displacements of nodes (strain) in the
-previous iteration, and they in turn cause displacements of nodes in the next
-iteration.
-
-In order to reduce errors of these approximations, the element size is very
-small, resulting in a large number of elements (typically hundreds of
-thousands). The sheer amount of computations lends this problem to parallel
-computing. Also, since connectivity of elements is small, this results in good
-computation to communication ratios. However, the arbitrary connectivity of
-unstructured meshes, alongwith dynamic physical phenomena introduce
-irregularity and dynamic behavior, which are difficult to handle using
-traditional parallel computing methods.
-
-The FEM Framework presented in this section is an attempt to provide the right
-infrastructure for programming parallel FEM applications. It is built on top of
-\charmpp.
-
-\subsection{Design Priciples}
-
-The basic philosophy of the FEM framework is to hide most details of
-parallelization from the FEM application developer. Thus, the FEM application
-developer writes sequential code for performing computations over a partition
-of the mesh. Partitioning, communication, and synchronization are performed by
-the framework.
-
-Computational structure of most FEM codes resembles the following pseudocode:
-
-\begin{alltt}
-  read connectivity information from a grid file
-  read initial values for nodes
-  read boundary conditions
-  repeat until termination criterion is satisfied
-    for all elements e, do
-      for each node n connected to element e, do
-        contribute to n some value based solely on e.
-      end for
-    end for
-    for all nodes n, do
-      update node values
-    end for
-  end repeat
-  write final values for nodes
-\end{alltt}
-
-A node may have different instances of values that are contributed from an
-element, such as forces, temperatures, pressures etc. Also, the element and
-node loops may be repeated more than once in the program operating on different
-value. The termination criterion may be error based, which requires a reduction
-across all elements, or all nodes; or it may be based on a fixed number of such
-iterations.
-
-FEM framework is developed in \charmpp\ in order to facilitate dynamic
-applications, where the runtime, or computational load of each partition may
-vary at runtime. When load imbalance occurs, \charmpp\ moves these partitions
-automatically in order to rebalance the load.
-
-Most of the existing FEM codes are written using fortran77 or fortran90.  We
-provide interefaces for these languages. This avoids having to write the entire
-application in a different languages, and makes conversion from exisiting
-programs easier.
-
-
-\subsection{Writing an FEM Application}
-
-\subsection{Compiling and Running}
-
-\subsection{Support for Dynamic Applications}
index 22507f661962138136d942df9fa5361981225580..0829d20b94a650e317926663c70ce69334b54a97 100644 (file)
@@ -87,18 +87,6 @@ Version 1.0\\
 \section{iRecv Library}
 \input{irecv}
 
-\newpage
-\section{FEM Framework}
-\input{fem}
-
-\nocite{InterOpIPPS96}  % Just put a citation in here, so the makefile 
-                        % doesn't complain
-
-\newpage
-\addtocontents{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {}References}{46}}
-\bibliographystyle{plain}
-\bibliography{group}
-
 \newpage
 \addtocontents{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {}Index}{47}}
 \include{index}