8570a18fd437582562433f680e888d331ae72383
[charm.git] / doc / converse / threads.tex
1 \chapter{Threads}
2
3 The calls in this chapter can be used to put together runtime systems
4 for languages that support threads.
5 This threads package, like most thread packages, provides basic
6 functionality for creating threads, destroying threads, yielding, 
7 suspending, and awakening a suspended thread. In
8 addition, it provides facilities whereby you can write your own thread
9 schedulers.  
10
11 \section{Basic Thread Calls}
12
13 \function{typedef struct CthThreadStruct *CthThread;}
14 \index{CthThread}
15 \desc{This is an opaque type defined in {\tt converse.h}.  It represents
16 a first-class thread object.  No information is publicized about the
17 contents of a CthThreadStruct.}
18
19 \function{typedef void (CthVoidFn)();}
20 \index{CthVoidFn}
21 \desc{This is a type defined in {\tt converse.h}.  It represents
22 a function that returns nothing.}
23
24 \function{typedef CthThread (CthThFn)();}
25 \index{CthThFn}
26 \desc{This is a type defined in {\tt converse.h}.  It represents
27 a function that returns a CthThread.}
28
29 \function{CthThread CthSelf()}
30 \index{CthSelf}
31 \desc{Returns the currently-executing thread.  Note: even the initial
32 flow of control that inherently existed when the program began
33 executing {\tt main} counts as a thread.  You may retrieve that thread
34 object using {\tt CthSelf} and use it like any other.}
35
36 \function{CthThread CthCreate(CthVoidFn fn, void *arg, int size)}
37 \index{CthCreate}
38 \desc{Creates a new thread object.  The thread is not given control
39 yet.  To make the thread execute, you must push it into the
40 scheduler queue, using CthAwaken below.  When (and if) the thread
41 eventually receives control, it will begin executing the specified
42 function {\tt fn} with the specified argument.  The {\tt size}
43 parameter specifies the stack size in bytes, 0 means use the default
44 size.  Caution: almost all threads are created with CthCreate, but not
45 all.  In particular, the one initial thread of control that came into
46 existence when your program was first {\tt exec}'d was not created
47 with {\tt CthCreate}, but it can be retrieved (say, by calling {\tt
48 CthSelf} in {\tt main}), and it can be used like any other {\tt
49 CthThread}.}
50
51 \function{void CthFree(CthThread t)}
52 \index{CthFree}
53 \desc{Frees thread {\tt t}.  You may ONLY free the
54 currently-executing thread (yes, this sounds strange, it's
55 historical).  Naturally, the free will actually be postponed until the
56 thread suspends.  To terminate itself, a thread calls
57 {\tt CthFree(CthSelf())}, then gives up control to another thread.}
58
59 \function{void CthSuspend()}
60 \index{CthSuspend}
61 \desc{Causes the current thread to stop executing.
62 The suspended thread will not start executing again until somebody
63 pushes it into the scheduler queue again, using CthAwaken below.  Control
64 transfers to the next task in the scheduler queue.}
65
66 \function{void CthAwaken(CthThread t)}
67 \index{CthAwaken}
68 \desc{Pushes a thread into the scheduler queue.  Caution: a thread
69 must only be in the queue once.  Pushing it in twice is a crashable
70 error.}
71
72 \function{void CthAwakenPrio(CthThread t, int strategy, int priobits, int *prio)}
73 \index{CthAwakenPrio}
74 \desc{Pushes a thread into the scheduler queue with priority specified by 
75 {\tt priobits} and {\tt prio} and queueing strategy {\tt strategy}.  
76 Caution: a thread
77 must only be in the queue once.  Pushing it in twice is a crashable
78 error. {\tt prio} is not copied internally, and is used when the scheduler 
79 dequeues the message, so it should not be reused until then.}
80
81 \function{void CthYield()}
82 \index{CthYield}
83 \desc{This function is part of the scheduler-interface.  It simply
84 executes {\tt \{ CthAwaken(CthSelf()); CthSuspend(); \} }.  This combination
85 gives up control temporarily, but ensures that control will eventually
86 return.}
87
88 \function{void CthYieldPrio(int strategy, int priobits, int *prio)}
89 \index{CthYieldPrio}
90 \desc{This function is part of the scheduler-interface.  It simply
91 executes \\
92 {\tt\{CthAwakenPrio(CthSelf(),strategy,priobits,prio);CthSuspend();\}}\\
93 This combination
94 gives up control temporarily, but ensures that control will eventually
95 return.}
96
97 \function{CthThread CthGetNext(CthThread t)}
98 \index{CthGetNext}
99 \desc{Each thread contains space for the user to store a ``next'' field (the
100 functions listed here pay no attention to the contents of this field).
101 This field is typically used by the implementors of mutexes, condition
102 variables, and other synchronization abstractions to link threads
103 together into queues.  This function returns the contents of the next field.}
104
105 \function{void CthSetNext(CthThread t, CthThread next)}
106 \index{CthGetNext}
107 \desc{Each thread contains space for the user to store a ``next'' field (the
108 functions listed here pay no attention to the contents of this field).
109 This field is typically used by the implementors of mutexes, condition
110 variables, and other synchronization abstractions to link threads
111 together into queues.  This function sets the contents of the next field.}
112
113 \section{Thread Scheduling and Blocking Restrictions}
114
115 \converse{} threads use a scheduler queue, like any other threads
116 package.  We chose to use the same queue as the one used for \converse{}
117 messages (see section \ref{schedqueue}).  Because of this, thread
118 context-switching will not work unless there is a thread polling for
119 messages.  A rule of thumb, with \converse{}, it is best to have a thread
120 polling for messages at all times.  In \converse{}'s normal mode (see
121 section \ref{initial}), this happens automatically.  However, in
122 user-calls-scheduler mode, you must be aware of it.
123
124 There is a second caution associated with this design.  There is a
125 thread polling for messages (even in normal mode, it's just hidden in
126 normal mode).  The continuation of your computation depends on that
127 thread --- you must not block it.  In particular, you must not call
128 blocking operations in these places:
129
130 \begin{itemize}
131
132 \item{In the code of a \converse{} handler (see sections \ref{handler1}
133 and \ref{handler2}).}
134
135 \item{In the code of the \converse{} start-function (see section
136 \ref{initial}).}
137
138 \end{itemize}
139
140 These restrictions are usually easy to avoid.  For example, if you
141 wanted to use a blocking operation inside a \converse{} handler, you
142 would restructure the code so that the handler just creates a new
143 thread and returns.  The newly-created thread would then do the work
144 that the handler originally did.
145
146 \section{Thread Scheduling Hooks}
147
148 Normally, when you CthAwaken a thread, it goes into the primary
149 ready-queue: namely, the main \converse{} queue described in section
150 \ref{schedqueue}.  However, it is possible to hook a thread to make
151 it go into a different ready-queue.  That queue doesn't have to be
152 priority-queue: it could be FIFO, or LIFO, or in fact it could handle
153 its threads in any complicated order you desire.  This is a powerful
154 way to implement your own scheduling policies for threads.
155
156 To achieve this, you must first implement a new kind of ready-queue.
157 You must implement a function that inserts threads into this queue.
158 The function must have this prototype:
159
160 {\bf void awakenfn(CthThread t, int strategy, int priobits, int *prio);}
161
162 When a thread suspends, it must choose a new thread to transfer control
163 to.  You must implement a function that makes the decision: which thread
164 should the current thread transfer to.  This function must have this
165 prototype:
166
167 {\bf CthThread choosefn();}
168
169 Typically, the choosefn would choose a thread from your ready-queue.
170 Alternately, it might choose to always transfer control to a central
171 scheduling thread.
172
173 You then configure individual threads to actually use this new
174 ready-queue.  This is done using CthSetStrategy:
175
176 \function{void CthSetStrategy(CthThread t, CthAwkFn awakenfn, CthThFn choosefn)}
177 \index{CthSetStrategy}
178 \desc{Causes the thread to use the specified \param{awakefn} whenever
179 you CthAwaken it, and the specified \param{choosefn} whenever you
180 CthSuspend it.}
181
182 CthSetStrategy alters the behavior of CthSuspend and CthAwaken.
183 Normally, when a thread is awakened with CthAwaken, it gets inserted
184 into the main ready-queue.  Setting the thread's {\tt awakenfn} will
185 cause the thread to be inserted into your ready-queue instead.
186 Similarly, when a thread suspends using CthSuspend, it normally
187 transfers control to some thread in the main ready-queue.  Setting the
188 thread's {\tt choosefn} will cause it to transfer control to a thread
189 chosen by your {\tt choosefn} instead.
190
191 You may reset a thread to its normal behavior using CthSetStrategyDefault:
192
193 \function{void CthSetStrategyDefault(CthThread t)}
194 \index{CthSetStrategyDefault}
195 \desc{Restores the value of \param{awakefn} and \param{choosefn} to
196 their default values.  This implies that the next time you CthAwaken
197 the specified thread, it will be inserted into the normal ready-queue.}
198
199 Keep in mind that this only resolves the issue of how threads get into
200 your ready-queue, and how those threads suspend.  To actually make
201 everything ``work out'' requires additional planning: you have to make
202 sure that control gets transferred to everywhere it needs to go.
203
204 Scheduling threads may need to use this function as well:
205
206 \function{void CthResume(CthThread t)}
207 \index{CthResume}
208 \desc{Immediately transfers control to thread {\tt t}.  This routine is
209 primarily intended for people who are implementing schedulers, not for
210 end-users.  End-users should probably call {\tt CthSuspend} or {\tt
211 CthAwaken} (see below).  Likewise, programmers implementing locks,
212 barriers, and other synchronization devices should also probably rely
213 on {\tt CthSuspend} and {\tt CthAwaken}.}
214
215 A final caution about the {\tt choosefn}: it may only return a thread
216 that wants the CPU, eg, a thread that has been awakened using the {\tt
217 awakefn}.  If no such thread exists, if the {\tt choosefn} cannot
218 return an awakened thread, then it must not return at all: instead, it
219 must wait until, by means of some pending IO event, a thread becomes
220 awakened (pending events could be asynchonous disk reads, networked
221 message receptions, signal handlers, etc).  For this reason, many
222 schedulers perform the task of polling the IO devices as a side
223 effect.  If handling the IO event causes a thread to be awakened, then
224 the choosefn may return that thread.  If no pending events exist, then
225 all threads will remain permanently blocked, the program is therefore
226 done, and the {\tt choosefn} should call {\tt exit}.
227
228 There is one minor exception to the rule stated above (``the scheduler
229 may not resume a thread unless it has been declared that the thread
230 wants the CPU using the {\tt awakefn}'').  If a thread {\tt t} is part
231 of the scheduling module, it is permitted for the scheduling module to
232 resume {\tt t} whenever it so desires: presumably, the scheduling
233 module knows when its threads want the CPU.
234
235 \zap{
236 \function{void CthSetVar(CthThread t, void **var, void *val)}
237 \desc{Specifies that the global variable pointed to by {\tt
238 var} should be set to value {\tt val} whenever thread {\tt t} is
239 executing.  {\tt var} should be of type {\tt void *}, or at least
240 should be coercible to a {\tt void *}.  This can be used to associate
241 thread-private data with thread {\tt t}.
242
243 it is intended that this function be used as follows:}
244
245 \begin{alltt}
246     /* User defines a struct th_info containing all the thread-private  */
247     /* data he wishes to associate with threads.  He also defines       */
248     /* a global variable 'current_thread_info' which will always hold   */
249     /* the th_info of the currently-executing thread.                   */
250     struct th_info \{ ... \} *current_thread_info;
251
252     /* User creates a thread 't', and allocates a block of memory       */
253     /* 'tinfo' to hold the thread's private data.  User tells the       */
254     /* system that whenever thread 't' is running, the global variable  */
255     /* 'current_thread_info' should be set to 'tinfo'.  Thus, thread    */
256     /* 't' can access its private data just by dereferencing            */
257     /* 'current_thread_info'.                                           */
258     t = CthCreate( ... );
259     tinfo = (struct th_info *)malloc(sizeof(struct th_info));
260     CthSetVar(t, &current_thread_info, tinfo);
261 \end{alltt}
262
263 \desc{Note: you can use CthSetVar multiple times on a thread, thereby
264 attaching multiple data items to it.  However, each data item slows
265 down context-switch to that thread by a tiny amount.  Therefore, a
266 module should ideally attach no more than one data item to a thread.
267 We allow multiple data items to be attached so that independent
268 modules can attach data to a thread without interfering with each
269 other.}
270
271 \function{void *CthGetVar(CthThread t, void **var)}
272 \desc{This makes it possible to retrieve values previously stored with
273 {\tt CthSetVar} when {\tt t} is {\it not} executing.  Returns the value
274 that {\tt var} will be set to when {\tt t} is running.}
275 }