doc: More part/chapter refinement
[charm.git] / doc / charm++ / python.tex
1 The Python scripting language in \charmpp{} allows the user to dynamically
2 execute pieces of code inside a running application, without the need to
3 recompile. This is performed through the CCS (Converse Client Server) framework
4 (see ``Converse Manual'' for more information about this). The user specifies
5 which elements of the system will be accessible through the interface, as we
6 will see later, and then run a client which connects to the server.
7
8 In order to exploit this functionality, Python interpreter needs to be installed
9 into the system, and \charmpp{} LIBS need to be built with:\\
10 \texttt{./build LIBS $<$arch$>$ $<$options$>$}
11
12 The interface provides three different types of requests:
13
14 \begin{description}
15 \item[Execute] requests to execute a code, it will contain the code to be executed on the server, together with the instructions on how to handle the environment;
16 \item[Print] asks the server to send back all the strings which has been printed by the script until now;
17 \item[Finished] asks the server if the current script has finished or it is still running.
18 \end{description}
19
20 There are three modes to run code on the server, ordered here by increase of
21 functionality, and decrease of dynamic flexibility:
22 \begin{itemize}
23 \item \textbf{simple read/write} By implementing the \kw{read} and \kw{write} methods
24 of the object exposed to python, in this way single variables may be exposed,
25 and the code will have the possibility to modify them individually as desired.
26 (see section~\ref{pythonServerRW})
27 \item \textbf{iteration} By implementing the iterator functions in the server (see
28 \ref{pythonServerIterator}), the user can upload the code of a Python function
29 and a user-defined iterator structure, and the system will apply the specified
30 function to all the objects reflected by the iterator structure.
31 \item \textbf{high level} By implementing \kw{python} entry methods, the Python code uploaded can access them and activate complex, parallel operations that will be performed by the \charmpp{} application. (see section~\ref{pythonHighLevel})
32 \end{itemize}
33
34 The description will follow the client implementation first, and continuing then
35 on the server implementation.
36
37
38 \subsubsection{The client side}
39
40 \label{pythonClient}
41
42 In order to facilitate the interface between the client and the server, some
43 classes are available to the user to include into the client. Currently \CC{} and
44 java interfaces are provided.
45
46 \CC{} programs need to include \texttt{PythonCCS-client.h} into their
47 code. This file is among the \charmpp{} include files. For java, the package
48 \texttt{charm.ccs} needs to be imported. This is located under the java
49 directory on the \charmpp{} distribution, and it provides both the Python and
50 CCS interface classes.
51
52 There are three main classes provided: \texttt{PythonExecute},
53 \texttt{PythonPrint}, and \texttt{PythonFinished} which are used for the three
54 different types of request.
55
56 All of them have two common methods to enable communication across different platforms:
57
58 \begin{description}
59
60 \item[int size();]
61 Returns the size of the class, as number of bytes that will be
62 transmitted through the network (this includes the code and other dynamic
63 variables in the case of \texttt{PythonExecute}).
64
65 \item[char *pack();]
66 Returns a new memory location containing the data to be sent to the server, this
67 is the data which has to be passed to the \texttt{CcsSendRequest} function. The
68 original class will be unmodified and can be reused in subsequent calls.
69
70 \end{description}
71
72 A tipical invocation to send a request from the client to the server has the
73 following format:
74
75 \begin{alltt}
76 CcsSendRequest (&server, "pyCode", 0, request.size(), request.pack());
77 \end{alltt}
78
79 \subsubsection{PythonExecute}
80
81 \label{pythonExecute}
82
83 To execute a Python script on a running server, the client has to create an
84 instance of \texttt{PythonExecute}, the two constructors have the following
85 signature (java has a correspondent functionality):
86
87 \begin{alltt}
88 PythonExecute(char *code, bool persistent=false, bool highlevel=false, CmiUInt4 interpreter=0);
89 PythonExecute(char *code, char *method, PythonIterator *info, bool persistent=false,
90               bool highlevel=false, CmiUInt4 interpreter=0);
91 \end{alltt}
92
93 The second one is used for iterative requests (see~\ref{pythonIterator}). The
94 only required argument is the code, a null terminated string, which will not be
95 modified by the system. All the other parameters are optional. They refer to the
96 possible variants that an execution request can be. In particular, this is a
97 list of all the options present:
98
99 \begin{description}
100
101 \item[iterative]
102 If the request is a single code (false) or if it represents a function over
103 which to iterate (true) (see~\ref{pythonIterator} for more details).
104
105 \item[persistent]
106 It is possible to store information on the server which will be retained across
107 different client calls (such as simple data or complete libraries). True means
108 that the information will be retained on the server, false means that the
109 information will be deleted when the script terminates to run. In order to
110 properly dispose the memory, when the last call is made (and the data is not
111 anymore needed), this flag should be set to false. When information has been
112 stored on the server, in order to reuse it, the interpreter field of the request
113 should be set to the correct value (which was returned by the previous call, see
114 later in this subsection).
115
116 \item[high level]
117 In order to have the ability to call high level \charmpp{} functions (available
118 through the keyword \kw{python}) this flag must be set to true. If it is false,
119 the entire module ``charm'' will not be present, but the startup of the script
120 will be faster.
121
122 \item[print retain]
123 When the client decides to print some output back to the client, this data can be
124 retrieved with a PythonPrint request. If the output is not desired, this flag
125 can be set to false, and the output will be discarded. If it is set to true the
126 output will be saved waiting to be retrieved by the client. The data will
127 survive also after the termination of the Python script, and if not retrieved
128 will waste memory on the server.
129
130 \item[busy waiting]
131 Instead of returning immediately to the client a handle that can be used to
132 retrieve prints and check if the script has finished, the server will answer to
133 the client only when the script has terminated to run (and it will effectively
134 work as a PythonFinished request).
135
136 \end{description}
137
138 These flags can be set and checked with the following routines (CmiUInt4 represent a 4
139 byte unsigned integer):
140
141 \begin{alltt}
142 void setCode(char *set);
143 void setPersistent(bool set);
144 void setIterate(bool set);
145 void setHighLevel(bool set);
146 void setKeepPrint(bool set);
147 void setWait(bool set);
148 void setInterpreter(CmiUInt4 i);
149
150 bool isPersistent();
151 bool isIterate();
152 bool isHighLevel();
153 bool isKeepPrint();
154 bool isWait();
155 CmiUInt4 getInterpreter();
156 \end{alltt}
157
158 From a PythonExecute request, the server will answer with a 4 byte integer
159 value, which is a handle for the interpreter that is running. It can be used to
160 request for prints, check if the script has finished, and for reusing the same
161 interpreter (if it was persistent).
162
163 A value of 0 means that there was an error and the script didn't run. This is
164 typically due to a request to reuse of an existing interpreter which is not
165 available, either because it was not persistent or because another script is
166 still running on that interpreter.
167
168
169 \subsubsection{Auto-imported modules}
170
171 \label{pythonModules}
172
173 When a Python script is run inside a \charmpp{} application, two Python modules
174 are made available by the system. One is \textbf{ck}, the other is
175 \textbf{charm}. The first one is always present and it represent basic
176 functions, the second is related to high level scripting and it is present only
177 when this is enabled (see \ref{pythonExecute} for how to enable it, and
178 \ref{pythonHighLevel} for a description on how to implement charm functions).
179
180 The methods present in the \texttt{ck} module are the following:
181
182 \begin{description}
183
184 \item[printstr]
185 It accepts a string as parameter. It will write into the server stdout that string
186 using the \texttt{CkPrintf} function call.
187
188 \item[printclient]
189 It accepts a string as parameter. It will forward the string back to the client when it
190 issues a PythonPrint request. It will buffer the strings if the \texttt{KeepPrint}
191 option is true, otherwise it will discard them.
192
193 \item[mype]
194 It requires no parameters, and it will return an integer representing the
195 current processor where the code is executing. It is equivalent to the \charmpp{}
196 function \texttt{CkMyPe()}.
197
198 \item[numpes]
199 It requires no parameters, and it will return an integer representing the
200 total number of processors that the application is using. It is equivalent to
201 the \charmpp{} function \texttt{CkNumPes()}.
202
203 \item[myindex]
204 It requires no parameters, and it will return the index of the current element
205 inside the array, if the object under which Python is running is an array, or
206 None if it is running under a Chare, a Group or a Nodegroup. The index will be a
207 tuple containing as many numbers as the dimension of the array.
208
209 \item[read]
210 It accepts one object parameter, and it will perform a read request to the
211 \charmpp{} object connected to the Python script, and return an object
212 containing the data read (see \ref{pythonServerRW} for a description of this
213 functionality). An example of a call can be:
214 \function{value = ck.read((number, param, var2, var3))}
215 where the double parenthesis are needed to create a single tuple object
216 containing four values passed as a single paramter, instead of four different
217 parameters.
218
219 \item[write]
220 It accepts two object parameters, and it will perform a write request to the
221 \charmpp{} object connected to the Python script. For a description of this
222 method, see \ref{pythonServerRW}. Again, only two objects need to be passed, so
223 extra parenthesis may be needed to create tuples from individual values.
224
225 \end{description}
226
227 \subsubsection{Iterate mode}
228
229 \label{pythonIterator}
230
231 Sometimes some operations need to be iterated over all the elements in the
232 system. This ``iterative'' functionality provides a shortcut for the client user
233 to do this. As an example, suppose we have a system which contains particles,
234 with their position, velocity and mass. If we implement \texttt{read} and
235 \texttt{write} routines which allow us to access single particle attributes, we may
236 upload a script which doubles the mass of the particles with velocity greater
237 than 1:
238
239 \begin{alltt}
240 size = ck.read((``numparticles'', 0));
241 for i in range(0, size):
242     vel = ck.read((``velocity'', i));
243     mass = ck.read((``mass'', i));
244     mass = mass * 2;
245     if (vel > 1): ck.write((``mass'', i), mass);
246 \end{alltt}
247
248 Instead of all these read and writes, it will be better to be able to write:
249
250 \begin{alltt}
251 def increase(p):
252     if (p.velocity > 1): p.mass = p.mass * 2;
253 \end{alltt}
254
255 This is what the ``iterative'' functionality provides. In order for this to
256 work, the server has to implement two additional functions
257 (see~\ref{pythonServerIterator}), and the client has to pass some more
258 information together with the code. This information is the name of the function
259 that has to be called (which can be defined in the ``code'' or have already been
260 uploaded to a persistent interpreter), and a user defined structure which
261 specifies over what data the function should be invoked. These values can be
262 specified either while constructing the PythonExecute variable (see the second
263 constructor in section~\ref{pythonExecute}), or with the following methods:
264
265 \begin{alltt}
266 void setMethodName(char *name);
267 void setIterator(PythonIterator *iter);
268 \end{alltt}
269
270 As for the PythonIterator object, it has to be a class defined by the user, and
271 the user has to insure that the same definition is present inside both the
272 client and the server. The \charmpp{} system will simply pass this structure as
273 a void pointer. This structure needs to inherit from \texttt{PythonIterator}. It
274 is recommended that no pointers are used inside this class, and no dynamic
275 memory allocation. If this is the case, nothing else needs to be done.
276
277 If instead pointers and dynamic memory allocation is used, the following methods
278 have to be reimplemented:
279
280 \begin{alltt}
281 int size();
282 char * pack();
283 void unpack();
284 \end{alltt}
285
286 The first returns the size of the class/structure after being packed. The second
287 returns a pointer to a newly allocated memory containing all the packed data,
288 the returned memory must be compatible with the class itself, since later on
289 this same memory a call to unpack will be performed. Finally, the third will do
290 the work opposite to pack and fix all the pointers. This method will not return
291 anything and is supposed to fix the pointers ``inline''.
292
293 \subsubsection{PythonPrint}
294
295 \label{pythonPrint}
296
297 In order to receive the output printed by the Python script, the client needs to
298 send a PythonPrint request to the server. The constructor is:
299
300 \function{PythonPrint(CmiUInt4 interpreter, bool Wait=true, bool Kill=false);}
301
302 The interpreter for which the request is made is mandatory. The other parameters
303 are optional. The wait parameter represents whether a reply will be sent back
304 immediately to the client even if there is no output (false), or if the answer
305 will be delayed until there is an output (true). The \kw{kill} option set to
306 true means that this is not a normal request, but a signal to unblock the latest
307 print request which was blocking.
308
309 The returned data will be a non null-terminated string if some data is present
310 (or if the request is blocking), or a 4 byte zero data if nothing is present.
311 This zero reply can happen in different situations:
312
313 \begin{itemize}
314 \item If the request is non blocking and no data is available on the server;
315 \item If a kill request is sent, the previous blocking request is squashed;
316 \item If the Python code ends without any output and it is not persistent;
317 \item If another print request arrives, the previous one is squashed and the second one is kept.
318 \end{itemize}
319
320 As for a print kill request, no data is expected to come back, so it is safe to
321 call \texttt{CcsNoResponse(server)}.
322
323 The two options can also be dynamically set with the following methods:
324
325 \begin{alltt}
326 void setWait(bool set);
327 bool isWait();
328
329 void setKill(bool set);
330 bool isKill();
331 \end{alltt}
332
333 \subsubsection{PythonFinished}
334
335 \label{pythonFinished}
336
337 In order to know when a Python code has finished executing, especially when
338 using persistent interpreters, and a serialization of the scripts is needed, a
339 PythonFinished request is available. The constructor is the following:
340
341 \function{PythonFinished(CmiUInt4 interpreter, bool Wait=true);}
342
343 The interpreter corresponds to the handle for which the request was sent, while
344 the wait option refers to a blocking call (true), or immediate return (false).
345
346 The wait option can be dynamically modified with the two methods:
347
348 \begin{alltt}
349 void setWait(bool set);
350 bool isWait();
351 \end{alltt}
352
353 This request will return a 4 byte integer containing the same interpreter value
354 if the Python script has already finished, or zero if the script is still
355 running.
356
357 \subsubsection{The server side}
358
359 \label{pythonServer}
360
361 In order for a \charmpp{} object (chare, array, node, or nodegroup) to receive
362 python requests, it is necessary to define it as python-compliant. This is done
363 through the keyword \kw{python} placed in square brackets before the object name
364 in the .ci file. Some examples follow:
365
366 \begin{alltt}
367 mainchare [python] main \{\ldots\}
368 array [1D] [python] myArray \{\ldots\}
369 group [python] myGroup \{\ldots\}
370 \end{alltt}
371
372 In order to register a newly created object to receive Python scripts, the
373 method \texttt{registerPython} of the proxy should be called. As an example,
374 the following code creates a 10 element array myArray, and then registers it to
375 receive scripts directed to ``pycode''. The argument of \texttt{registerPython}
376 is the string that CCS will use to address the Python scripting capability of
377 the object.
378
379 \begin{alltt}
380 Cproxy_myArray localVar = CProxy_myArray::ckNew(10);
381 localVar.registerPython(``pycode'');
382 \end{alltt}
383
384
385 \subsubsection{Server \kw{read} and \kw{write} functions}
386
387 \label{pythonServerRW}
388
389 As explained previously in subsection~\ref{pythonModules}, some functions are
390 automatically made available to the scripting code through the {\em ck} module.
391 Two of these, \textbf{read} and \textbf{write} are only available if redefined
392 by the object. The signatures of the two methods to redefine are:
393
394 \begin{alltt}
395 PyObject* read(PyObject* where);
396 void write(PyObject* where, PyObject* what);
397 \end{alltt}
398
399 The read function receives as a parameter an object specifying from where the data
400 will be read, and returns an object with the information required. The write
401 function will receive two parameters: where the data will be written and what
402 data, and will perform the update. All these \texttt{PyObject}s are generic, and
403 need to be coherent with the protocol specified by the application. In order to
404 parse the parameters, and create the value of the read, please refer to the
405 manual \htmladdnormallink{``Extending and Embedding the Python Interpreter''}{http://docs.python.org/}, and in particular to the functions
406 \texttt{PyArg\_ParseTuple} and \texttt{Py\_BuildValue}.
407
408 \subsubsection{Server iterator functions}
409
410 \label{pythonServerIterator}
411
412 In order to use the iterative mode as explained in
413 subsection~\ref{pythonIterator}, it is necessary to implement two functions
414 which will be called by the system. These two functions have the following
415 signatures:
416
417 \begin{alltt}
418 int buildIterator(PyObject*, void*);
419 int nextIteratorUpdate(PyObject*, PyObject*, void*);
420 \end{alltt}
421
422 The first one is called once before the first execution of the Python code, and
423 receives two parameters. The first is a pointer to an empty PyObject to be filled with
424 the data needed by the Python code. In order to manage this object, some utility
425 functions are provided. They are explained in subsection~\ref{pythonUtilityFuncs}.
426
427 The second is a void pointer containing information of what the iteration should
428 run over. This parameter may contain any data structure, and an agreement between the
429 client and the user object is necessary. The system treats it as a void pointer
430 since it has no information of what user defined data it contains.
431
432 The second function (\texttt{nextIteratorUpdate}) has three parameters. The
433 first contains the object to be filled like in \texttt{buildIterator}, but this
434 time the object contains the PyObject which was provided for the last iteration,
435 potentially modified by the Python function. Its content can be read with the
436 provided routines, used to retrieve the next logical element in the iterator
437 (with which to update the parameter itself), and possibly update the content of
438 the data inside the \charmpp{} object. The second parameter is the object
439 returned by the last call to the Python function, and the third parameter is the
440 same data structure passed to \texttt{buildIterator}.
441
442 Both functions return an integer which will be interpreted by the system as follows:
443 \begin{description}
444 \item[1] - a new iterator in the first parameter has been provided, and the Python function should be called with it;
445 \item[0] - there are no more elements to iterate.
446 \end{description}
447
448 \subsubsection{Server utility functions}
449
450 \label{pythonUtilityFuncs}
451
452 They are inherited when declaring an object as Python-compliant, and therefore
453 they are available inside the object code. All of them accept a PyObject pointer
454 where to read/write the data, a string with the name of a field, and one or two
455 values containing the data to be read/written (note that to read the data from
456 the PyObject, a pointer needs to be passed). The strings used to identify the
457 fields will be the same strings that the Python script will use to access the
458 data inside the object.
459
460 The name of the function identifies the type of Python object stored inside the
461 PyObject container (i.e String, Int, Long, Float, Complex), while the parameter
462 of the functions identifies the \CC object type.
463
464 \begin{alltt}
465 void pythonSetString(PyObject*, char*, char*);
466 void pythonSetString(PyObject*, char*, char*, int);
467 void pythonSetInt(PyObject*, char*, long);
468 void pythonSetLong(PyObject*, char*, long);
469 void pythonSetLong(PyObject*, char*, unsigned long);
470 void pythonSetLong(PyObject*, char*, double);
471 void pythonSetFloat(PyObject*, char*, double);
472 void pythonSetComplex(PyObject*, char*, double, double);
473
474 void pythonGetString(PyObject*, char*, char**);
475 void pythonGetInt(PyObject*, char*, long*);
476 void pythonGetLong(PyObject*, char*, long*);
477 void pythonGetLong(PyObject*, char*, unsigned long*);
478 void pythonGetLong(PyObject*, char*, double*);
479 void pythonGetFloat(PyObject*, char*, double*);
480 void pythonGetComplex(PyObject*, char*, double*, double*);
481 \end{alltt}
482
483 To handle more complicated structures like Dictionaries, Lists or Tuples, please refer to \htmladdnormallink{``Python/C API Reference Manual''}{http://docs.python.org/}.
484
485 \subsubsection{High level scripting}
486
487 \label{pythonHighLevel}
488
489 When in addition to the definition of the \charmpp{} object as \kw{python}, an
490 entry method is also defined as \kw{python}, this entry method can be accessed
491 directly by a Python script through the {\em charm} module. For example, the
492 following definition will be accessible with the python call:
493 \function{result = charm.highMethod(var1, var2, var3)}
494 It can accept any number of parameters (even complex like tuples or
495 dictionaries), and it can return an object as complex as needed.
496
497 The method must have the following signature:
498
499 \begin{alltt}
500 entry [python] void highMethod(int handle);
501 \end{alltt}
502
503 The parameter is a handle that is passed by the system, and can be used in
504 subsequent calls to return values to the Python code. %Thus, if the method
505 %does not return immediately but it sends out messages to other \charmpp{}
506 %objects, the handle must be saved somewhere. \textbf{Note:} if another Python
507 %script is sent to the server, this second one could also call the same function.
508 %If this is possible, the handle should be saved in a non-scalar variable.
509
510 The arguments passed by the Python caller can be retrieved using the function:
511
512 \function{PyObject *pythonGetArg(int handle);}
513
514 which returns a PyObject. This object is a Tuple containing a vector of all
515 parameters. It can be parsed using \texttt{PyArg\_ParseTuple} to extract the
516 single parameters.
517
518 When the \charmpp's entry method terminates (by means of \texttt{return} or
519 termination of the function), control is returned to the waiting Python script.
520 Since the \kw{python} entry methods execute within an user-level thread, it is
521 possible to suspend the entry method while some computation is carried on in
522 \charmpp. To start parallel computation, the entry method can send regular messages,
523 as every other threaded entry method (see~\ref{libraryInterface} for more
524 information on how this can be done using CkCallbackResumeThread callbacks). The
525 only difference with other threaded entry methods is that here the callback
526 \texttt{CkCallbackPython} must be used instead of CkCallbackResumeThread. The
527 more specialized CkCallbackPython callback works exactly like the other one,
528 except that it handles correctly Python internal locks.
529
530 At the end of the computation, if a value needs to be returned to the Python script,
531 the following special returning function has to be used:
532
533 \function{void pythonReturn(int handle, PyObject* result);}
534
535 where the second parameter is the Python object representing the returned value.
536 The function \texttt{Py\_BuildValue} can be used to create this value. This
537 function in itself does not terminate the entry method, but only sets the
538 returning value for Python to read when the entry method terminates.
539
540 A characteristic of Python is that in a multithreaded environment (like the one
541 provided in \charmpp{}), the running thread needs to keep a lock to prevent
542 other threads to access any variable. When using high level scripting, and the
543 Python script is suspended for long periods of time while waiting for the
544 \charmpp{} application to perform the required task, the Python internal locks
545 are automatically released and re-acquired by the \texttt{CkCallbackPython}
546 class when it suspends.
547
548 % This can be done using the two functions:
549
550 %\begin{alltt}
551 %void pythonAwake(int handle);   // to acquire the lock
552 %void pythonSleep(int handle);   // to release the lock
553 %\end{alltt}
554
555 %Important to remember is that before any Python value is accessed, the Python
556 %interpreter must be awake. This include the functions \texttt{Py\_BuildValue} and
557 %\texttt{PyArg\_ParseTuple}. \textbf{Note:} it is an error to call these functions
558 %more than once before the other one is called.